Kansas

Beef Chat

Apr162014

Preparing for Grilling Season

Published by Robin Kleine at 6:16 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General

One of these days, the weather is going to break and spring will be here to stay! [I’m crossing my fingers over here at least.]


When spring hits, I am ready to cook my meals on the grill. I like nearly anything cooked that way – vegetables, pizzas and you guessed it BEEF!


After all those months of sitting idle, there are some things you’ll want to check for before firing up your grill.


The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) shares a few tips here (http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/outdoors/grilling/grilling-safety-tips).

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should only be used outdoors.
  • The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill.
  • Never leave your grill unattended.

 

When using a charcoal grill, you can start the fire with a charcoal chimney starter that uses newspaper as a fuel. If you choose to use a starter fluid, use one specifically for charcoal grills. Other flammable substances can flare up uncontrollably or leave an aftertaste on your food. After you have finished grilling, be sure to let the coals cool completely before disposing in a metal container. Picture courtesy of Safety Training Services.

 

If you choose to use a propane grill, be sure to check the gas tank hose for leaks when starting your grill for the first time this spring. Here’s how, according to the NFPA –

 

Apply a light soap and water solution to the hose. A propane leak will release bubbles. If your grill has a gas leak, by smell or the soapy bubble test, and there is no flame, turn off the gas tank and grill. If the leak stops, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again. If the leak does not stop, call the fire department. If you smell gas while cooking, immediately get away from the grill and call the fire department. Do not move the grill.

 

Just by taking a few moments to properly assess your grill, you could save your family’s lives. Once your grill passes these quick tests, you’re ready to grill up a delicious meal.

 

What’s your favorite thing to cook on the grill? I like burgers, mixed with onion soup mix on a toasted bun (on the grill too) and topped with provolone cheese.

 

Until next time,

Robin



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Apr112014

Bucket Calves

Published by Kiley Stinson at 5:07 AM under Agriculture | General

Finally, the forecast has featured 70 degree weather all week long and I think we’ve waved old man winter goodbye!  Yippy Skippy! The grass is greening up, trees are budding and it’s much more fun to feed bucket calves in shorts and boots vs. snow suits and gloves!

 

“What’s a bucket calf you ask?”

 

A bucket calf is the term we use to describe a baby calf that has lost its mother. Sometimes a momma cow has twins and doesn’t have enough milk to feed two babies or momma might not claim her new born baby period. When something like this happens, farmers and ranchers quickly take the young calves under their wing and provide immediate care for them. At this point the calves are fed milk through bottles or buckets; hence the name “bucket calf.”

 

 

Bethany helps love on a new calf that had a rough start during a snow storm earlier in the year.

 

Since we raise beef cattle, we don’t have access to fresh cow’s milk like dairy farms do to feed orphan calves, so we select a quality milk replacer; I think of it as baby formula for cattle! Milk replacer is the primary source of food for the first few weeks of a calf's life.

 

 

Owen lent a helping hand with mixing the powdered milk replacer and water.

 

Young calves cannot yet digest grains or hay like an adult cow can. Once a calf is old enough to begin digesting grains and fiber, we will begin the transition from milk replacer to then providing a starter feed. Bucket calves also need a routine; therefore the kiddos feed calves twice a day at the same times each day.

 

  

 

Dinner Time!!!

Twins Andrea and Owen help feed one of the calves while Leo feeds the other. 

 

Since my soon –to– be niece Bethany is old enough to be in 4-H she will be working hard every day to care for these calves as part of the bucket calf project that she is enrolled in. The bucket calf project is a fantastic way to teach kids responsibility, proper health and nutritional requirements of young cattle, basic beef management skills and record-keeping skills!

Stay tuned for future updates on the bucket calf project!

Until next time,

Kiley



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Apr042014

Details, Details

Published by Heath Larson at 9:10 AM under Beef Team | General | Nutrition

The start of the Boston Marathon is less than three weeks away.  It's crunch time.  Thankfully, the long training runs of 16 miles and longer are complete.  However, even with the best of training, there are many seemingly insignificant details that I will be busy dealing with before toeing the line on April 21st.  One example:

 

Electrolytes--The last time I ran the Boston Marathon was in 2009.  With only 4 or 5 miles to go, I just KNEW that something wasn't quite right.  But, spurred on by the raucous crowds, I was too stubborn to stop to figure it out.  In fact, I even quit stopping for water and Gatorade.  Bad idea.  When I finally drug my poor carcass across the finish line, I was quickly carted to the medical tent.  Elated about my finish but a bit "foggy" from the electrolyte imbalance, I was relieved when the staff cured me with a true miracle remedy: Two bags of the best potato chips I've ever tasted.  My electrolytes and hydration need to be dialed in on race day to prevent a reprise of this awful experience.

 

When I also think about the details of pacing strategy (math+hills+weather=confusion), crowds (Is it even possible to run fast in a crowd of 36,000?), blister avoidance (ouch), and chafing (even worse), it's easy to become overwhelmed.  However, to ignore these details is to invite disaster.

 

Most of us know that lean beef contains a large amount of muscle-building protein without a lot of calories.  But what about the details?  What about some of the unsung, dare I say, "forgotten" nutrients?

 

Zinc--Lean Beef is the number 1 food source for zinc. Many may know that zinc helps maintain a healthy immune system, but it also plays an important part in synthesizing protein.  How about that?  A high amount of protein, and an increased ability to process it too...all in that single 3 oz. serving of lean beef!

 

Vitamin B12--Lean beef is also the number 1 food source for vitamin B12.  This vitamin helps convert carbohydrates (which all runners love) into glucose (energy).  What more could a runner ask for?  Better hair in the finish line photo?!  Amazingly, vitamin B12 is important for healthy hair too!

 

I'm looking forward to putting all the details together for a solid race while representing Team Beef in Boston.  Many of them will have to come together at the last minute.  One thing, however, has already been decided:  There's nothing better than a steak the night before the race.

 



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Mar252014

Kansas Ag Week!

Published by Kassie Curran at 10:05 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General

This week is a very special celebration – its Kansas Ag Week! Kansas Governor Brownback signed a proclamation declaring March 23-29 as Kansas Agriculture Week and March 25, Kansas Agriculture Day. Not only are we celebrating agriculture in Kansas, but Tuesday, March 25, 2014 is also National Agriculture Day! Check it out at http://www.agday.org/.

 

This is a week devoted to celebrating the strong tradition of agriculture in Kansas and throughout the nation by bringing awareness to the importance of agriculture in our everyday lives. As the state’s largest economic driver, agriculture provides us with so much to be grateful for. There are farmers and ranchers in communities across the state and nation that work hard to grow the food, fiber, and fuel that we use each day. But agriculture is more than farming and ranching! In order for us to enjoy the many products that come from agriculture, we must remember the agribusinesses that support farmers and ranchers, as well as those that add value to what’s grown on the farm.

 

While we may recognize that it is important for today’s farmers, ranchers, and agribusinesses grow enough food for our families, it is also important to recognize that we have more people on earth each day that also need food. With the population projected to reach 9 billion by the year 2050, there is a serious challenge ahead of us – all of us!

 

Agriculture is a team – a team that needs all hands on deck, including you, to work towards overcoming the challenge of feeding 9 billion people by 2050 with fewer resources. We must consider how we can be innovative, collaborative, and diligent in working with everyone in the food chain to meet the nutritional needs and consumer preferences in today’s society, as well as tomorrow.

 

I encourage you to get involved in Kansas Ag Week. Whether you want to learn more about where your food comes from, how you can contribute to the team, or how you can teach others about the importance of agriculture – we need you on the agriculture team!

 

At Kansas State University, Kansas Ag Week is being celebrated with Ag Fest events all week long. These include a “Give Thanks to Agriculture” booth in the student union, agriculture awareness workshops at the public library, a social media challenge, agriculture demonstrations for elementary school students, informational session about careers in agriculture for high school students, an agriculture competition event for college students, plus much more. There are also several fundraiser events being held all week to raise money for the Harvester’s Community Food Network for food banks in Kansas. Check out http://www.ag.k-state.edu/current-students/clubs-and-activities/ag-fest.html.

 

You can also “Like” K-State College of Agriculture Student Council on Facebook to learn more about Ag Fest, and use the hashtags #agfest and #ksagday on social media! 

 

Join the agriculture team and celebrate Kansas Agriculture this week!

Kassie



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Mar202014

National Nutrition Month

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 3:48 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

March is National Nutrition Month. The theme for 2014 is “Enjoy the taste of eating right.” The key to eating right is to combine both taste and nutrition to create healthy meals.  During busy weeknights, meals need to combine great taste and nutrition, along with convenience.  Lean beef is a tasty solution to this dinnertime dilemma.  With 29 cuts meeting the requirements for lean, beef is a tasty and nutritious addition to any meal.  Plus, lean beef is an excellent source of high quality protein, zinc and iron; and can be simple and easy to prepare.  Portion size is key, the recommended serving for beef is 3-4 ounces of cooked lean beef.  To complete your meal, aim to fill half of your plate with veggies and fruits, ¼ whole grain and one serving of low-fat dairy.  Try these winning recipes during your busy weeknights.

 

Buffalo-Style Beef Tacos - Combine cooked ground beef crumbles with buffalo wing hot sauce, as desired. Cook until heated through; spoon into hard or soft corn tortillas. Top with shredded lettuce, chopped carrots and celery. Drizzle with low-fat ranch or blue cheese dressing. Serve with Healthy Choice frozen yogurt and fresh or frozen berries.

 

Rock and Roll Beef Wraps

 

Rock and Roll Beef Wraps - Consumer -- A colorful way to introduce quinoa to your kids with ranch-seasoned Ground Beef and slaw.

A colorful way to introduce quinoa to your kids with ranch-seasoned Ground Beef and slaw.

Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

1 pound Ground Beef (93% lean or leaner)

1 cup water

1/3 cup uncooked quinoa

2 tablespoons dry ranch dressing mix

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

2 cups packaged broccoli or coleslaw mix

4 medium whole grain or spinach tortillas (7 to 8-inch diameter)

Toppings (optional):

Apple slices, red bell pepper strips, cucumber slices, carrot slices, sliced almonds or chow mein noodles

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ROCK AND ROLL BEEF WRAPS

1.       Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add Ground Beef; cook 8 to 10 minutes, breaking into 1/2-inch crumbles and stirring occasionally. Remove drippings.

2.       Stir in water, quinoa, ranch dressing mix and pepper; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 10 to 15 minutes or until quinoa is tender. Stir in slaw; cook, uncovered, 3 to 5 minutes or until slaw is crisp-tender, stirring occasionally.

3.       Divide beef mixture evenly among tortillas; garnish with toppings, as desired. Fold over sides of tortillas and rolling up to enclose filling.

·         Cooking times are for fresh or thoroughly thawed Ground Beef. Ground Beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F. Color is not a reliable indicator of Ground Beef doneness.

Nutrition information per serving: 418 calories; 12 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 76 mg cholesterol; 695 mg sodium; 41 g carbohydrate; 6.8 g fiber; 31 g protein; 6.4 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 2.3 mcg vitamin B12; 5.6 mg iron; 19.6 mcg selenium; 6.6 mg zinc; 84.2 mg choline.

This recipe is an excellent source of fiber, protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron, selenium and zinc; and a good source of choline.

 

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stir-Fry  -- Beef & Vegetable Stir-Fry

Complete meal in minutes! 

Serves: 4

Ingredients:


1 ½ lbs. chuck tender fillet, cut across the grain into thin strips

1 tsp. sesame oil

1 tbsp. canola oil

1-2 cloves garlic, minced

4 cups assorted precut Asian veggies (if frozen, cook a few minutes longer)

3 tbsp. water

½ cup prepared stir-fry sauce, House of Tsang classic stir-fry is a good one

2 cups cooked hot brown rice

2 tbsp. dry-roasted peanuts, optional

Directions:

  1. Place the water and veggies in a large nonstick skillet.  Cover and cook over medium-high heat four minutes, or until crisp-tender.  Remove and drain.

  2. Heat the same pan over medium-high heat with both oils and garlic.  Add beef in batches; stir-fry 1-2 minutes until outside is browned.

  3. Return all beef and veggies to pan.  Add stir-fry sauce and heat through.  Spoon over rice.  Sprinkle with peanuts if desired.

    Nutrition Facts per serving (with ½ cup rice): 390 calories, 5 g fat, 1.5 g saturated fat, 1100 mg sodium, 35 g carbohydrate, 4 g fiber, 35 g protein *Recipe provided by The Beef Council



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Mar142014

Lifecycle of a Cow

Published by Katie Sawyer at 2:23 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General



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Feb282014

Not Exactly What I Call A Snow Day

Published by Kiley Stinson at 3:03 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General

Saturday marks the 1st of March and most of you are thinking, ‘yay spring is right around the corner’ …but not so fast, the latest weather forecast is predicting another nice sized snow storm for our area this weekend. I won’t say too many things about old man winter, because we really did need some serious moisture this winter out on the prairie.  But, heavy snow and extended periods of below freezing temperatures can sure take a toll on life on a cattle ranch.

Winter on the ranch is a beautiful sight, but it also means a lot of work for those caring for the animals. Ranchers feed them, break ice for them so they can drink from water tanks and ponds, build windbreaks and lay down straw and hay in the pastures to provide a warmer place for them to lie.  Cattle can handle below freezing temperatures if they are kept dry, adequately fed, and have plenty of water. Here are a few pictures that have been taken this winter in the northern parts of Lyon County, Kansas on the ranch of Keith Cattle Company.

Soon to be mommas being called in for dinner time.

One last drink for the cows before they head back to shelter from the snow.

Sick calves still need to be cared for when the weather isn’t so kind to the cowboys.

And then God gives you this moment. Complete peace surrounds you and you’re reminded why we’re caretakers of this land and caregivers for these wonderful cows.

Until next time,
Kiley



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Feb192014

What It Takes

Published by Heath Larson at 10:15 AM under Agriculture | Beef Team | Coffee Shop Talk | General

It's Time for the Winter Olympics!  And whether you're a curling fanatic or a downhill skiing fan, chances are strong that you heard about the Jamaican bobsled team's improbable run to this year's Olympic Games.  They qualified for the games for the first time since 2002, only to realize they had one week to raise $80,000 for team costs in order to compete at the games.  But nothing is impossible when you're a Jamaican bobsledder.  They raised the cash, and managed to compete in Sochi, against obstacles most would find insurmountable. 

 

The first ever Olympic Jamaican bobsled team was of course immortalized in the 1993 Disney Classic "Cool Runnings."  One of my favorite parts of the film occurs between the coach (Irv) and Sanka, who thinks he should be the driver, instead of his more dedicated friend, Derice: 

Irv: You see Sanka, the driver has to work harder than anyone. He's the first to show up, and the last to leave. When his buddies are all out drinking beer, he's up in his room studying pictures of turns. You see, a driver must remain focused one hundred percent at all times. Not only is he responsible for knowing every inch of every course he races, he's also responsible for the lives of the other men in the sled. Now do you want that responsibility?

Sanka: I say we make Derice the driver. 

Irv: So do I, Sanka. So do I.

 

This spring, I will be running the Boston Marathon, which is essentially a combination of a world class 3 hour foot race and a parade.  The weather will be nice (hopefully), and the crowd of 500,000 spectators will be incredibly supportive.  What few people realize is how much sacrifice, how much time "studying pictures of turns" each runner has put into that one single race.  Without a treadmill at home and no gym membership, I am often out running for 2-3 hours in very unfriendly late winter weather in preparation for Boston.  Two days ago, the wind was so strong on my 15 miler that I wasn't even sure I'd be able to finish.    However, that's the price that must be paid for a strong race in Boston.

 

In a similar vein, it's calving season on most ranches across the state.  While everyone loves seeing new baby calves take their first steps, few understand the sacrifice it takes on behalf of the rancher to keep each calf alive.  New calves must be protected from brutal late winter snowstorms and "rookie" heifers that don't know how to take care of them.  It's often the case that the rancher has to help pull the calf out by hand during labor.  And during calving season, there are no hours or schedules.  Ranchers are up at all hours of the night and day, sacrificing sleep and sanity, ensuring that the newest members of their herd (and their mothers) are safe and sound.

 

So whether you're sitting inside watching the luge, or out playing with your kids in the next winter storm, don't forget to say a prayer for the ranchers working overtime to protect their cattle from the elements.  And while our task isn't remotely as important, don't forget about the crazy spring marathoners trying to grind out another long training run in the cold!



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Feb132014

Heart Healthy Beef for You and Your Valentine

Published by Kassie Curran at 10:38 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

As we have shared many times on Kansas Beef Chat, lean beef is good for the heart. As part of the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) study, individuals had a 10 percent decline in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol when they consumed lean beef as part of heart-healthy diet.

To celebrate your heart and Valentine’s Day, try one of these recipes using Tenderloin or T-Bone steaks. Not only are these beef cuts delicious, they are heart healthy, lean choices that are packed with nutrients including protein, zinc, vitamin B 12, vitamin B6, niacin, selenium, phosphorus, choline, iron, and riboflavin.

Spicy Five-Pepper T-Bone Steaks

Total Recipe Time:  60 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 beef T-bone steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 16 ounces each)

Five-Pepper Seasoning:

3 tablespoons coarsely ground mixed peppercorns (black, white, green and pink)

2 teaspoons kosher or table salt

1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper

Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce:

2 teaspoons vegetable oil

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 cup ketchup

1/2 cup beef broth

1/3 cup raisins

3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon molasses

1 tablespoon soy sauce

Additional beef broth (optional)

1.  Combine Five-Pepper Seasoning ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Reserve 2 teaspoons for Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce. Set aside remaining mixture for seasoning beef steaks.

2.  To prepare Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce, heat oil in small saucepan over medium heat until hot. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir 1 to 2 minutes or until tender but not browned. Stir in ketchup, broth, raisins, vinegar, molasses, soy sauce and reserved 2 teaspoons Five-Pepper Seasoning; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer gently 10 minutes to blend flavors, stirring occasionally. (Sauce will thicken slightly.)

3.  Place sauce in blender or food processor container. Cover; pulse on and off for slightly chunky texture. (For a thinner sauce, additional broth may be added 1 tablespoon at a time; pulse on and off after each addition.) Return sauce to saucepan; keep warm until ready to serve.

4.  Press remaining Five-Pepper Seasoning evenly onto beef steaks. Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, uncovered, 14 to 16 minutes for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally.

5.  Remove bones; carve steaks crosswise into slices. Serve with sauce.

Makes 4 servings

Cook's Tip:  Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce may be prepared ahead and frozen in an airtight container for up to 2 months. To reheat, heat from frozen in a saucepan over medium heat until hot, stirring occasionally.

Cook's Tip:  Mixed peppercorns are sold in specialty food markets and some supermarkets. If a four-peppercorn mix is not available, a three-peppercorn mix may be substituted. Or make your own mix by combining equal amounts of whole black, white, green and pink peppercorns.

To easily grind whole peppercorns, use a pepper mill or coffee grinder (used only for seasonings). They can also be crushed in a food-safe plastic bag. Place the peppercorns in the bag, squeeze out the air and seal. Use the bottom of a custard cup, rolling pin or side of a heavy pan to crush the peppercorns.

Cook's Tip:  Serve this classic steak with simple sides such as steamed broccoli and roasted new potatoes.

Nutrition information per serving: 335 calories; 11 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat); 48 mg cholesterol; 1984 mg sodium; 35 g carbohydrate; 3.1 g fiber; 26 g protein; 5.1 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 1.9 mcg vitamin B12; 4.5 mg iron; 9.8 mcg selenium; 4.6 mg zinc.

 

Grilled Beef Steaks with Espresso-Bourbon Sauce

Total Recipe Time:  35 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 beef Tenderloin Steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 4 ounces each) or 2 Strip Steaks boneless, cut 1 inch thick (about 1-1/4 pounds)

Salt and pepper

Espresso-Bourbon Sauce:

1/4 cup bourbon

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons instant espresso coffee powder

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

1.  Combine all sauce ingredients, except pepper, in small saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, 8 minutes or until sauce is thickened and reduced by about half, stirring occasionally. Stir in pepper. Keep warm.

2.  Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill tenderloin steaks, covered, 10 to 14 minutes (top loin steaks 11 to 14 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Season with salt and pepper, as desired. Serve with sauce.

Nutrition information per serving, using Tenderloin Steaks: 271 calories; 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 67 mg cholesterol; 658 mg sodium; 15 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 26 g protein; 7.2 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 1.4 mcg vitamin B12; 1.8 mg iron; 28.9 mcg selenium; 5.4 mg zinc; 95.1 mg choline.

Find these and more great beef recipes at www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com.

Eat Beef!!!

Kassie



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Feb072014

Good Fats for Good Health

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 3:26 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

There’s news about your health and the fats you eat that may surprise you… you don’t have to avoid fat! The key is to eliminate trans fats and limit saturated fats in your diet; while focusing on increasing unsaturated fats as much as possible.  Examples of this would be to choose lean cuts of beef that contain the word “round” or “loin”, or simply replace a high-fat salad topping (bacon) with nuts. Research has shown substituting 5% of saturated fat in the diet with more heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats may decrease the risk of developing heart disease by 7%. Celebrate National Heart Healthy month by taking steps to protect your heart with healthy, unsaturated fats. It may be easier than you think! Plus, it doesn’t mean you have to give up eating red meat. The BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) study compared the consumption of 4 ounces of lean beef daily to the gold standard of heart-healthy eating, the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. Both diets contained a similar mix of nutrients, including fewer than 7% of calories from saturated fat, but the BOLD diet contained 4 ounces of lean beef each day while the DASH diet limited red meat. At the end of the study, BOTH diets lowered LDL “bad” cholesterol in participants by 10%, providing evidence that beef may not be as bad for cholesterol and heart health as once thought. 

Which types of fats should I look for?
Omega 3s (Polyunsaturated Fat)
Omega 9s (Monounsaturated Fat)
Steric Acid – a non-harmful form of saturated fat found naturally in beef

What are the possible benefits?
Healthy Heart
Improved Blood Cholesterol
Blood Sugar Control
Brain Development & Function
Improved Mood


Healthy Fat Shopping List:
Fruit:
Avocado & Olives
Nuts:
Almonds, Pistachios, Walnuts, Hy-Vee Natural Peanut Butter
Oils:
Canola, Olive, Sunflower
Beef:
Round & Loin cuts, 95% lean ground beef or leaner
Fish:
Salmon, Tuna, Mackerel

 

Grilled Steaks with Beets & Radicchio
Makes: 2 servings


Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons crumbled reduced fat feta cheese
2 teaspoons white-wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1 tablespoon minced shallot
2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 small head radicchio, halved, cored and each half quartered
1 8-ounce can baby beets, drained
8 ounces top sirloin steak, trimmed and cut into 2 portions
 
Directions:
1. Preheat grill to high.
2. Place cheese in a medium bowl and mash it with the back of a spoon until creamy. Add vinegar, dry mustard, shallot, parsley, 1/8 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper; whisk to combine. Slowly drizzle in 2 teaspoons oil and whisk until blended.
3. Thread radicchio chunks and beets onto skewers and drizzle with 1 teaspoon oil. Rub steaks with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon oil. Season the steaks and skewered vegetables with the remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt and pepper.
4. Grill the steaks 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium-rare. Grill the vegetable skewers, turning frequently, until the radicchio is wilted and lightly charred, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer the steaks to a plate; let rest for 5 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the skewers. Serve steaks and vegetables with the sauce.
Recipe slightly adapted from EatingWell, Inc.
Nutrition Facts per serving: 302 calories; 16 g fat ( 4 g saturated , 9 g monounsaturated ); 64 mg cholesterol; 15 g carbohydrates; 26 g protein; 3 g fiber; 458 mg sodium; 819 mg potassium.



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