Kansas

Beef Chat

Sep042014

Savor the Flavor - Mushrooms and Beef

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 8:23 AM under General | Recipe

Fall is the perfect season for harvesting mushrooms. Although they are available year-round, mushrooms are in peak season during the fall and winter months. In fact, September is National Mushroom Month—how suiting! 

Mushrooms are a truly inexpensive, versatile vegetable. Mushrooms are a delicious complement to any cuisine, adding exquisite flavor, savoriness and volume as well as boosting vegetable intake. The earthy, umami-rich taste of mushrooms allows them to blend well with a variety of flavors. Umami is one of the basic tastes, along with sweet, salty, sour and bitter. This taste, created by the amino acid glutamate, is described as pleasant and savory and is found in foods such as meat, dairy, fish and vegetables. When you pair two umami foods like mushrooms and lean beef they create a flavor explosion for your taste buds to enjoy! 

Mushrooms and lean beef are, without a doubt, nutritional powerhouses. Mushrooms are low in calories, fat and sodium, and they provide antioxidants which may protect our body’s cells from damage caused by free radicals. They are an excellent source of riboflavin, a B vitamin that is important for energy, growth and red blood cell production. Mushrooms are also a good source of:

  • Selenium: A mineral known for its antioxidant properties; may play a role in preventing cancer of the colon, prostate, lung, bladder, skin, esophagus and stomach

  • Copper: A mineral necessary for producing and storing iron

  • Potassium: A mineral which aids in lowering blood pressure

Beef is high in 10 essential nutrients.  Those nutrients include protein, iron, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, zinc, phosphorous, niacin, riboflavin, selenium and choline. Protein helps preserve and build muscle, while iron helps your body use oxygen The B vitamins found in beef will give you energy and help maintain brain function.  Choline is especially important for pregnant and nursing moms as it has been linked to brain development. 

Many people have been told to stay away from red meats if they have high cholesterol or want to keep their heart healthy. However, beef can be part of a heart-healthy diet. The BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) study is one reason for new viewpoints on beef. The BOLD diet contained 4 ounces of lean beef each day while the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet limited red meat. The study found that BOTH diets lowered LDL cholesterol in participants by 10%, providing evidence that beef may not be as bad for cholesterol and heart health as once thought.

There are more than 29 cuts of beef that meet government guidelines for “lean.” An easy way to identify lean cuts of meat is to look for the word “loin” or “round” in the name. Some of the lean cuts of meat include tenderloin, top sirloin, round steak and ground round.

 

Try this savory dish to create an umami flavor explosion.

 

 Seared Steak with Mustard-Mushroom Sauce http://bed56888308e93972c04-0dfc23b7b97881dee012a129d9518bae.r34.cf1.rackcdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/standard/recipes/MB8173_Ardito.JPG

Serves 4 (3-ounce steak and about 1/4 cup sauce each)

Active time: 25 minutes

Total time: 25 minutes

All you need:

1 to 1 1/4 pounds Hy-Vee Angus Reserve Top Sirloin, trimmed

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

2 tablespoons Hy-Vee Select extra-virgin olive oil, divided

4 ounces mushrooms, sliced

1/2 cup finely chopped onion

2 teaspoons Hy-Vee all-purpose flour

3/4 cup Kitchen Basics unsalted beef stock, or any low-sodium stock

1/4 cup dry white wine

1 tablespoon Hy-Vee Dijon mustard

All you do:

  1. Pat steaks dry; cut into 4 equal portions. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until very hot, but not smoking. Cook the steaks until browned on the bottom, 2 to 4 minutes. Turnover, reduce heat to medium-low and cook 3 to 5 minutes for medium-rare. Set aside, covered with foil.
  2. Increase heat to medium-high. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil to the pan. Add mushrooms and onion and cook, stirring frequently, until the mushrooms have released their liquid, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with flour and stir to coat the vegetables, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Pour in broth and wine and cook, stirring and scraping up the brown bits, until thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, 2 to 4 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat. Stir in mustard and any juices from the steak. Serve the steak with about 1/4 cup sauce each.

Nutrition facts per serving: 239 calories, 12g fat, 3g saturated fat, 62mg cholesterol, 250mg sodium, 4g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 24g protein

Source: Adapted from Eating Well, Inc.



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Feb132014

Heart Healthy Beef for You and Your Valentine

Published by Kassie Curran at 10:38 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

As we have shared many times on Kansas Beef Chat, lean beef is good for the heart. As part of the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) study, individuals had a 10 percent decline in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol when they consumed lean beef as part of heart-healthy diet.

To celebrate your heart and Valentine’s Day, try one of these recipes using Tenderloin or T-Bone steaks. Not only are these beef cuts delicious, they are heart healthy, lean choices that are packed with nutrients including protein, zinc, vitamin B 12, vitamin B6, niacin, selenium, phosphorus, choline, iron, and riboflavin.

Spicy Five-Pepper T-Bone Steaks

Total Recipe Time:  60 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 beef T-bone steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 16 ounces each)

Five-Pepper Seasoning:

3 tablespoons coarsely ground mixed peppercorns (black, white, green and pink)

2 teaspoons kosher or table salt

1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper

Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce:

2 teaspoons vegetable oil

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 cup ketchup

1/2 cup beef broth

1/3 cup raisins

3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon molasses

1 tablespoon soy sauce

Additional beef broth (optional)

1.  Combine Five-Pepper Seasoning ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Reserve 2 teaspoons for Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce. Set aside remaining mixture for seasoning beef steaks.

2.  To prepare Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce, heat oil in small saucepan over medium heat until hot. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir 1 to 2 minutes or until tender but not browned. Stir in ketchup, broth, raisins, vinegar, molasses, soy sauce and reserved 2 teaspoons Five-Pepper Seasoning; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer gently 10 minutes to blend flavors, stirring occasionally. (Sauce will thicken slightly.)

3.  Place sauce in blender or food processor container. Cover; pulse on and off for slightly chunky texture. (For a thinner sauce, additional broth may be added 1 tablespoon at a time; pulse on and off after each addition.) Return sauce to saucepan; keep warm until ready to serve.

4.  Press remaining Five-Pepper Seasoning evenly onto beef steaks. Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, uncovered, 14 to 16 minutes for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally.

5.  Remove bones; carve steaks crosswise into slices. Serve with sauce.

Makes 4 servings

Cook's Tip:  Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce may be prepared ahead and frozen in an airtight container for up to 2 months. To reheat, heat from frozen in a saucepan over medium heat until hot, stirring occasionally.

Cook's Tip:  Mixed peppercorns are sold in specialty food markets and some supermarkets. If a four-peppercorn mix is not available, a three-peppercorn mix may be substituted. Or make your own mix by combining equal amounts of whole black, white, green and pink peppercorns.

To easily grind whole peppercorns, use a pepper mill or coffee grinder (used only for seasonings). They can also be crushed in a food-safe plastic bag. Place the peppercorns in the bag, squeeze out the air and seal. Use the bottom of a custard cup, rolling pin or side of a heavy pan to crush the peppercorns.

Cook's Tip:  Serve this classic steak with simple sides such as steamed broccoli and roasted new potatoes.

Nutrition information per serving: 335 calories; 11 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat); 48 mg cholesterol; 1984 mg sodium; 35 g carbohydrate; 3.1 g fiber; 26 g protein; 5.1 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 1.9 mcg vitamin B12; 4.5 mg iron; 9.8 mcg selenium; 4.6 mg zinc.

 

Grilled Beef Steaks with Espresso-Bourbon Sauce

Total Recipe Time:  35 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 beef Tenderloin Steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 4 ounces each) or 2 Strip Steaks boneless, cut 1 inch thick (about 1-1/4 pounds)

Salt and pepper

Espresso-Bourbon Sauce:

1/4 cup bourbon

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons instant espresso coffee powder

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

1.  Combine all sauce ingredients, except pepper, in small saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, 8 minutes or until sauce is thickened and reduced by about half, stirring occasionally. Stir in pepper. Keep warm.

2.  Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill tenderloin steaks, covered, 10 to 14 minutes (top loin steaks 11 to 14 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Season with salt and pepper, as desired. Serve with sauce.

Nutrition information per serving, using Tenderloin Steaks: 271 calories; 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 67 mg cholesterol; 658 mg sodium; 15 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 26 g protein; 7.2 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 1.4 mcg vitamin B12; 1.8 mg iron; 28.9 mcg selenium; 5.4 mg zinc; 95.1 mg choline.

Find these and more great beef recipes at www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com.

Eat Beef!!!

Kassie



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Feb072014

Good Fats for Good Health

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 3:26 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

There’s news about your health and the fats you eat that may surprise you… you don’t have to avoid fat! The key is to eliminate trans fats and limit saturated fats in your diet; while focusing on increasing unsaturated fats as much as possible.  Examples of this would be to choose lean cuts of beef that contain the word “round” or “loin”, or simply replace a high-fat salad topping (bacon) with nuts. Research has shown substituting 5% of saturated fat in the diet with more heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats may decrease the risk of developing heart disease by 7%. Celebrate National Heart Healthy month by taking steps to protect your heart with healthy, unsaturated fats. It may be easier than you think! Plus, it doesn’t mean you have to give up eating red meat. The BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) study compared the consumption of 4 ounces of lean beef daily to the gold standard of heart-healthy eating, the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. Both diets contained a similar mix of nutrients, including fewer than 7% of calories from saturated fat, but the BOLD diet contained 4 ounces of lean beef each day while the DASH diet limited red meat. At the end of the study, BOTH diets lowered LDL “bad” cholesterol in participants by 10%, providing evidence that beef may not be as bad for cholesterol and heart health as once thought. 

Which types of fats should I look for?
Omega 3s (Polyunsaturated Fat)
Omega 9s (Monounsaturated Fat)
Steric Acid – a non-harmful form of saturated fat found naturally in beef

What are the possible benefits?
Healthy Heart
Improved Blood Cholesterol
Blood Sugar Control
Brain Development & Function
Improved Mood


Healthy Fat Shopping List:
Fruit:
Avocado & Olives
Nuts:
Almonds, Pistachios, Walnuts, Hy-Vee Natural Peanut Butter
Oils:
Canola, Olive, Sunflower
Beef:
Round & Loin cuts, 95% lean ground beef or leaner
Fish:
Salmon, Tuna, Mackerel

 

Grilled Steaks with Beets & Radicchio
Makes: 2 servings


Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons crumbled reduced fat feta cheese
2 teaspoons white-wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1 tablespoon minced shallot
2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 small head radicchio, halved, cored and each half quartered
1 8-ounce can baby beets, drained
8 ounces top sirloin steak, trimmed and cut into 2 portions
 
Directions:
1. Preheat grill to high.
2. Place cheese in a medium bowl and mash it with the back of a spoon until creamy. Add vinegar, dry mustard, shallot, parsley, 1/8 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper; whisk to combine. Slowly drizzle in 2 teaspoons oil and whisk until blended.
3. Thread radicchio chunks and beets onto skewers and drizzle with 1 teaspoon oil. Rub steaks with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon oil. Season the steaks and skewered vegetables with the remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt and pepper.
4. Grill the steaks 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium-rare. Grill the vegetable skewers, turning frequently, until the radicchio is wilted and lightly charred, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer the steaks to a plate; let rest for 5 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the skewers. Serve steaks and vegetables with the sauce.
Recipe slightly adapted from EatingWell, Inc.
Nutrition Facts per serving: 302 calories; 16 g fat ( 4 g saturated , 9 g monounsaturated ); 64 mg cholesterol; 15 g carbohydrates; 26 g protein; 3 g fiber; 458 mg sodium; 819 mg potassium.



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Apr122013

More Heart Healthy Beef

Published by Kassie Curran at 8:39 AM under General | Nutrition | Recipe

As the warmer weather and much needed rain comes, there are many things to be excited about this spring! One of those is the opportunity to try some new recipes with the newest beef cuts added to the American Heart Association’s list of heart healthy beef cuts. These cuts are eligible to include the heart check mark label on the retail package so consumers are visually reminded and encouraged to include beef as part of a heart healthy diet. The American Heart Association recently added sirloin tip steak, bottom round steak, and top sirloin stir fry to the list that already included boneless top sirloin petite roast, the top sirloin filet and the top sirloin kebab.
 
Research supported by the Beef Checkoff says that more than 83 percent of consumers have an “aided awareness” of the Heart-Check mark, and nearly 75 percent of primary grocery shoppers say the Heart-Check mark improves the likelihood that they'll buy a product.
 
This is exciting news for beef producers and retailers. The opportunity to promote beef as part of a heart healthy diet increases the amount of times beef is in the center of the plate. Check out this fun, delicious, heart healthy recipe that includes bottom round steak.

 

Beef Steak and Black Bean Soft Tacos

 
 
Total Recipe Time:  25 to 30 minutes

1 pound beef bottom round steaks, cut 1/4 inch thick
1 cup salsa, divided
2 teaspoons chili powder
1-1/2 teaspoons ground cumin, divided
1 can (15 ounces) reduced sodium black beans, rinsed, drained, divided
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
8 small corn or flour tortillas (5 to 6-inch diameter), warmed

Toppings:
Thinly sliced lettuce, sliced avocado, chopped tomato, salsa, crumbled queso fresco and cilantro leaves (optional)
 

 
1.
Combine 1/2 cup salsa, chili powder and 1 teaspoon cumin. Place beef steaks and marinade in food-safe plastic bag; turn to coat. Close bag securely and marinate in refrigerator 6 hours or as long as overnight, turning occasionally.
2.
Combine 1 cup beans, remaining 1/2 cup salsa and 1/2 teaspoon cumin in medium microwave-safe bowl. Mash with fork into chunky paste. Cover and microwave on HIGH 1 to 2 minutes or until hot, stirring once. Keep warm.
3.
Meanwhile, heat 1-1/2 teaspoons oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Remove steaks from marinade; discard marinade. Cooking in batches, place steaks in skillet (do not overcrowd) and cook 2 to 3 minutes for medium rare (145°F) doneness, turning once. (Do not overcook.) Remove steaks from skillet; keep warm. Repeat with remaining steaks and oil.
4.
Spread bean mixture evenly on tortillas. Cut steaks into 4 pieces each and divide evenly among tortillas. Top beef with remaining beans and Toppings, as desired. Fold tortillas in half to serve.

Makes 4 servings
Nutrition information per serving: 308 calories; 9 g fat (2 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 64 mg cholesterol; 508 mg sodium; 29 g carbohydrate; 6.6 g fiber; 30 g protein; 9.6 mg niacin; 0.7 mg vitamin B6; 3.8 mcg vitamin B12; 4.2 mg iron; 35.7 mcg selenium; 5.0 mg zinc; 84.0 mg choline.

This recipe is an excellent source of fiber, protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron, selenium and zinc; and a good source of choline.
     
 
For this and more great beef recipes visit http://www.beefretail.org/recipe.aspx?recipeid=5226
 
Eat Beef!!!
Kassie


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Feb222013

Lean Beef – Adding Flavor to Heart Health

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 4:09 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

Have you been told you have high cholesterol? Instead of hearing “No red meat!”, you’ll now hear Hy-Vee dietitians encouraging the consumption of lean beef as part of a heart-healthy diet. The BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) study compared the consumption of 4 ounces of lean beef daily to the gold standard of heart-healthy eating, the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. Both diets contained a similar mix of nutrients, including fewer than 7% of calories from saturated fat, but the BOLD diet contained 4 ounces of lean beef each day while the DASH diet limited red meat. At the end of the study, BOTH diets lowered LDL “bad” cholesterol in participants by 10%, providing evidence that beef may not be as bad for cholesterol and heart health as once thought. Advancements in science may also change the way consumers view beef.

·         Beef is leaner than it was fifty years ago. A sirloin steak now has 34% less total fat, compared to a sirloin steak in 1963.

·         We also know that over half the fat in beef is actually monounsaturated fat, the same type of heart-healthy fat found in olive oil.

·         There are more than 29 cuts of beef that meet government guidelines for “lean,” including T-bone, tenderloin, top sirloin and 95%-lean ground beef. Look for the words “loin” and “round” in the name to help identify lean beef cuts.  Or visit http://www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/leanbeef.aspx for a complete listing of lean cuts. 

Use the plate method to help incorporate lean beef in a heart-healthy way. Balance your plate with one-fourth lean meat or protein, one-fourth whole grains or starchy veggies like potatoes, corn and peas, and one-half non-starchy veggies or fruit. For example, serve top sirloin steak with steamed green beans, roasted cauliflower, and a whole-grain roll for a tasty meal.

 

3 Easy Steps to Pan-Broil – Top Sirloin Steak

·         Stovetop skillet cooking is ideal for cooking a tender, juicy top sirloin steak during the winter months.

o   Step 1: Heat heavy nonstick skillet over medium heat for 5 minutes.

o   Step 2: Remove steak from refrigerator and season as desired, such as with kosher salt and cracked black pepper. Place steak in preheated skillet, don’t add water or oil and leave uncovered.

o   Step 3: Pan-broil top sirloin steak 12 to 15 minutes for medium-rare (145˚) to medium (160˚) doneness, turning occasionally.

Skillet Steaks with Sautéed Wild Mushrooms

Serves 4. Total Recipe Time: 25 to 30 minutes

All you need:

2 teaspoons olive oil

3 cups assorted wild mushrooms (such as cremini, oyster, shiitake,

enoki and morel)*

2 cloves garlic, minced, divided

2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme

1 to 1-1/4 pounds beef top sirloin cap steaks, cut 1-inch thick

Kosher salt and pepper, to taste

All you do:

1.      Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add mushrooms and 1 clove minced garlic; cook and stir 2 to 4 minutes or until mushrooms are tender and browned. Remove; keep warm.

2.      Combine thyme and remaining garlic; press evenly onto beef steaks. Place steaks in same skillet over medium heat; cook 8 to 11 minutes for medium-rare to medium doneness, turning occasionally. Remove to platter.

3.      Carve steaks into slices. Season with salt and pepper, as desired. Top with mushrooms.

*Cook’s Tip: Three cups sliced button mushrooms can be substituted for assorted wild mushrooms.

Nutrition information per serving: 195 calories; 9 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat); 71 mg cholesterol; 8 mg

sodium; 4 g carbohydrate; 1.5 g fiber; 26 g protein; 9.2 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 2.3 mcg vitamin B12; 4.3 mg iron; 31.5

mcg selenium; 5.4 mg zinc; 18.5 mg choline. This recipe is an excellent source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron,

selenium and zinc 



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Jan162013

New Year, New You with Lean Beef

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 5:49 AM under General | Nutrition | Recipe

Have you resolved to eat better in 2013?  Beef can help you keep your New Year’s resolution and it tastes great too!  The BOLD diet (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) is similar to the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) in that it is high in vegetables, fruits and whole grains.  However, the BOLD diet includes 4-5.7 ounces of lean beef daily, where the DASH diet focuses mostly on white meat and plant proteins to meet the daily protein requirement.  New research provides convincing evidence that the BOLD diet can actually help reduce your LDL cholesterol!  Yep, that’s right, eating beef can actually help lower your cholesterol!  But, before you go eating a 16 oz. ribeye, there a few parameters to keep in mind. 

The study focused on a portion-controlled amount of beef.  To put 3-4.7 ounces into perspective, 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards.  And, the cuts used in the BOLD research were lean cuts, meaning they met guidelines for total and saturated fat amounts.  The good news is 65% of all beef in the meat case is lean!  I recommend looking for the word “loin” for the leanest, most tender cut of beef.  Top sirloin is the jack of all trades when it comes to enjoying lean beef.  Any cut with the word “round” is also lean.  Round cuts often are not as tender, so marinating, moist-heat and not over cooking will be some tips to ensure a tasty meal. 

What you put with your lean beef is equally important.  Keep in mind half of our plate should be filled with non-starchy veggies at lunch and dinner.  Veggies fill you up without filling you out and are loaded with disease-fighting antioxidants.  All forms count, so if fresh go to waste in your house switch to frozen veggies for a quick solution.  Only one fourth of your plate should be starch, keep in mind all potatoes, corn and peas are higher in starch and fit better into this category.  Most of my clients are filling half of their plate with starches.  Whole grains are loaded with essential nutrients as well, but in large quantities that will prevent weight loss and lead to weight gain. 

So as you are looking to get lean and eat healthier in 2013 think about your plate – ¼ lean protein (lean beef goes here!), ¼ starch/whole grain, and ½ your plate non-starchy veggies!  Try this Beef & Ranchero Skillet for a quick meal!  Keep in mind the pepper and salsa in the recipe would not be half of what you are eating.  To get your recommended veggies, pair it with a salad or even microwave steamed broccoli!

 

 

Beef & Ranchero Skillet

Preparation time: 20 minutes

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound 95% lean ground beef
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups cooked rice, cooled
  • 1 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • ¾ cup salsa


Instructions:

1.   Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add ground beef, bell pepper and garlic over medium heat 8 to 10 minutes, breaking beef up into 3/4-inch crumbles. Remove drippings. Season with chili powder and salt.

2.   Add rice to skillet; mix well. Continue cooking 2 minutes or until rice is hot; stir occasionally. Stir in peas and salsa; heat through.

Nutrition Facts:

Nutrition information per serving, using 95% lean ground beef: 380 calories; 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 76 mg cholesterol; 757 mg sodium; 45 g carbohydrate; 5.5 g fiber; 32 g protein; 12.5 mg niacin; 0.7 mg vitamin B6; 2.3 mcg vitamin B12; 5.3 mg iron; 27.8 mcg selenium; 7.0 mg zinc; 958 mg choline.



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Mar232012

Beef is for Dinner, Fish is for Lent

Published by Brett Haas at 9:49 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition

I’m not Catholic, but I’m thinking of converting.  Well, maybe that’s a bit extreme, but I may in my own way, take part in Lent.  Let me explain.
 A few weeks back, I was contacted by fellow ag blogger, Suzanne Fairchild.  Suzanne was wondering if I could write a piece for her blog Fairchild Farm Girl.  In the process of conversation, she mentioned that she was observing Lent.  I’ve always been curious why fish was popular during Lent so, for some reason, I asked. “Basically” she said, “Fish isn’t considered meat.”
 
I knew it.  I have to say that I’ve always suspected this, along with turkey burger, and perhaps even chicken.  Although chicken is a great carrier for those herbs and spices.  And of course in following with the “It tastes good so it must be bad/It tastes bad so it must be good” type of thinking, fish has had praises heaped upon it as being the wonder food that will make you lose weight, lower your “bad” or LDL cholesterol, allow you to compete in the Iron Man at 90 years plus, and basically make you live forever.  After all, that’s how the Greeks do it, and they live to 133, or maybe that’s retire at 33.  I can’t  remember.
 
So, anywho, as a producer of what’s for dinner, coupled with March being National Nutrition month, I have to admit I was pretty pleased with what I heard at my county KLA meeting last night.  Audrey Monroe, the director of nutrition at the Kansas Beef Council talked about a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  Researchers at Penn State compared four different diets with two of those including lean beef as the main source of protein.  What they found counters most of today’s conventional wisdom concerning red, or as I call it, real meat.  It turns out that the lean beef diets lowered LDL cholesterol just as much as the DASH diet, which is considered the gold standard of heart healthy diets.
 
 
So, as I was moving some beeves around today a horseback on a beautiful Kansas spring day, I was ruminating about feeding the world not only a delicious dish of beef, but a healthy one too.  I have to admit that I kind of felt sorry for those other wanna-be meats.  After all, the only thing they really had going for them was health benefits.  Now, that that’s vamoosed, I’m thinking they’re gonna need some marketing help.  I have the following suggestions.
 
Chicken:  It will taste like whatever you put on it.
Fish:  God made this for vegetarians and Lent.
Turkey:  We’re like taxes, we’ll be there once a year, but you’ll like us (unless we are in burger form).


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Mar072012

Beef is BOLD!

Published by Kassie Curran at 3:43 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

I guess you could say I want it all. I want the best of both when making decisions about all kinds of things. Whether it is the best deal at the mall or the grocery store, the most time spent on homework and with friends, or the most taste and nutrients in my food, I am always looking for value. While my dad is right that I can’t always have it all, I sure try my best!
 
Choosing beef makes it easy to get the most bang for my buck…with one 3 oz. serving (about the size of a deck of cards) of beef, which is 150 calories, you get an excellent source of protein, zinc, iron, and vitamins with great taste and certainly no lack of flavor! Now individuals who are on the DASH diet for heart health can also enjoy beef as part of the new BOLD diet. Penn State researchers performed the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) study, which confirmed that consuming lean beef daily as part of a heart-healthy diet lowered LDL “bad” cholesterol by 10 percent, which was just as effective as the DASH diet (1).
 
I can’t think of a better value than that—full of great taste, flavor, nutrients, and is heart healthy! Try this recipe to make beef a part of your heart healthy diet:
 
Farmer’s Market Vegetable, Beef and Brown Rice Salad
1 beef Top Round steak, cut 3/4-inch-thick (about 1 lb.)
1 tsp olive oil
2 cups asparagus (2-inch pieces)
1medium yellow squash, cut lengthwise in half, then 1/4-inch slices
3 cups hot cooked brown rice
2 tsp chopped fresh oregano
1 cup diced, seeded tomatoes
1 cup canned garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
1/4 cup fresh basil, thinly sliced
1/2 tsp salt
 
Marinade
1/4 cup olive oil
2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
 1 Tbsp garlic, minced
1 Tbsp honey
2 tsp chopped fresh thyme
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 tsp pepper
 
1. Combine marinade ingredients in small bowl. Place beef steak and 1/4 cup marinade in food-safe plastic bag; turn steak to coat. Close bag securely and marinate in refrigerator 6 hours or as long as overnight. Reserve remaining marinade in refrigerator for dressing.
2. Remove steak from marinade; discard marinade. Place steak on rack in broiler pan so surface of beef is 2 to 3 inches from heat. Broil 12 to 13 minutes for medium-rare doneness, turning once. Remove; keep warm.
3. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add asparagus and squash; cook and stir 7 to 8 minutes or until tender. Toss with rice, tomatoes, beans, basil, salt and reserved marinade in large bowl.
4. Carve steak into thin slices. Serve over rice salad.
 
Be BOLD and EAT BEEF!!!
Kassie Curran
 
1. Roussell MA, Hill AM, Gaugler, TL, West SG, Vanden Heuvel JP, Alaupovic P, Gillies PJ, Kris-Etherton PM. Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) Study- Effects on Lipids, Lipoproteins and Apolipoproteins. Am J Clin Nutr 2012; 95(1):9-16. 


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Mar022012

Recipe from Chef Matt

Published by Chef Matt Chatfield at 6:07 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Recipe

This is a favorite among the staff here at The Culinary Center. It is a lean cut of beef and fits in to the comfort foods and slow cooking methods we are using this time of year.
 
Chef Matt’s
Boulevard Wheat Beer
Braised Brisket
1 piece beef brisket flat
2 each carrots, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 celery ribs, chopped
3 sprigs fresh thyme
2 bottles Boulevard Wheat Beer
3 tbsp  Turbinado sugar
2 tablespoons Kosher salt
2 tablespoons coarse ground pepper
1 tablespoon granulated garlic
 
Equipment needed:
Baking pan, plastic wrap, aluminum foil
 
Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Chop vegetables and spread in bottom of baking pan. Rub brisket with spices and place in pan, fat side up. Top with thyme sprigs. Pour beer in bottom of pan. Cover pan tightly with plastic wrap and then foil, creating a good seal around the edge to keep liquid from escaping. Bake at 350 degrees for 3-4 hours, to desired tenderness, 185-195 degrees F, or fork tender.
 
Remove brisket from pan and cool before slicing. Can be cooked ahead, sliced and reheated when needed. You may use the pan drippings to make a delicious sauce to serve with it.
 
Chef Matt Chatfield
 


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Jan122012

Beef is #1 for the New Year

Published by Robin Kleine at 4:10 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition

New Year’s resolutions rarely last, but if you’re craving a steak KEEP READING --- My resolution is to eat more beef!

Love your heart as much as you love a steak!

According a recent WebMD blog by David Grotto, RD LND, beef is the #1 food to include in your diet for 2012.

Grotto mentioned that heart healthy beef is effective in lowering LDL cholesterol (low density lipoprotein, aka “bad cholesterol”) by 10%. The blog also went on to mention the 29 lean cuts of beef, like the top sirloin, brisket and Kansas City strip steak!

Also joining the list were roasted nuts, chocolate, whole eggs and coffee. Looks like steak and eggs, with a small dessert of brownies for me!

Find the whole blog here --- http://blogs.webmd.com/food-and-nutrition/2012/01/five-foods-you-dont-have-to-give-up-this-year.html



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