Kansas

Beef Chat

Jan062016

Feed Time

Published by Kiley De Donder at 3:19 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | Nutrition | Recipe

Over the weekend our family wrapped up the final Christmas gathering for the season. It was truly a joyous occasion! Along with the out of town siblings and cousins, came a solid storm of rain and sleet. Precipitation is welcomed 9 times out of 10 on the farm, but lately it’s turning into a nuisance. With the abundance of moisture we’ve received it makes for tougher conditions for the cattle and with shorter days, cold temps and hardly any sun it takes forever for the ground to dry up. We spend extra time feeding and providing shelter to minimize the stress of the conditions. Here’s an inside look at chore time from this weekend.

       

Cattle lined up at the bunks                         Big round bales of hay are rolled out for      pastured cattle to eat.

 

 It’s a fun change of pace to have everyone home on the farm during the holidays. There are always tons of fun and never a shortage of food. Another perk of big family gatherings, there tends to be a few leftovers. Not all families love leftovers, but ours seems to eat them just fine. So, I thought I’d share an extremely quick beef and sweet potato hash recipe that uses several common ingredients you’re likely to have on hand following a traditional family gathering on a Kansas farm… Hashes are a great way to use leftovers. The combination of ingredients is limitless and work great morning, noon or night. And at less than 350 calories per serving, you can enjoy it without the guilt of a big dish and all the “fixings”

 

For additional leftover recipe ideas visit beefitswhatsfordinner.com

 

Have a happy and prosperous New Year!

Kiley

 

INGREDIENTS

12 ounces cooked beef (such as steak, roast or pot roast), cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 2-1/2 cups)

1 large sweet potato, unpeeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

1 medium yellow onion, chopped

1 tablespoon taco seasoning mix

1/4 cup water

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

2 tablespoons reduced-fat or regular dairy sour cream

1 teaspoon hot sauce

Chopped fresh cilantro


INSTRUCTIONS FOR BEEFY SWEET POTATO HASH

Combine sweet potatoes, onion and taco seasoning in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add water. Cover and cook 8 to 10 minutes or until crisp-tender and water has almost evaporated, stirring once. Stir in oil; continue cooking, uncovered, 4 to 6 minutes or until potatoes are tender and begin to brown, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, combine sour cream and hot sauce in small bowl. Set aside.

Add beef to potato mixture. Continue to cook 5 minutes or until beef is heated through, stirring occasionally, adding 1 to 2 tablespoons water, if needed to avoid sticking.

Garnish with cilantro, as desired. Serve with sour cream mixture.

Nutrition information per serving: 329 calories; 10 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 4 g monounsaturated fat); 63 mg cholesterol; 387 mg sodium; 33 g carbohydrate; 5.4 g fiber; 26 g protein; 3.0 mg niacin; 0.3 mg vitamin B6; 2.6 mcg vitamin B12; 3.7 mg iron; 26.1 mcg selenium; 5.6 mg zinc; 4.7 mg choline.

This recipe is an excellent source of fiber, protein, vitamin B12, iron, selenium and zinc; and a good source of niacin and vitamin B6.



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Nov132015

Thankful

Published by Heath Larson at 8:15 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General

I clearly remember feeling completely out of my element when working my first non-farm job.  Each day began and ended at the time clock, punching my card so my hours could be tracked. 

Conversely, in a farm family, "work" is woven into every single fiber of family life.  Vacations happen when rain forces you out of the field.  Summers revolve around wheat harvest, while winters revolve around twice-daily cattle feeding, periodic cattle drives, and late-winter calving.  Fortunately, during the limited amount of down time, the rewards of farm life can't be topped.  Were it not for family farm ground, I probably never would have had the opportunity to bond with my close friends over duck and pheasant hunts.  I grew up picking and eating sweet corn all summer long, the perfect complement to a fresh grilled, home-raised T-bone steak shared in the company of family after a day of hard work.
 

Today, I still carry these lessons with me.  I don't have to punch a time clock anymore, but, consistent with what I grew up with, I know I will be at work until the job is done, however long it takes.  Meal time is truly a sacred time for our growing family to relax, re-connect, and enjoy a cut of lean beef that supports the farm culture for which we are so thankful.  Perhaps the greatest rewards come when we take the time to return with our children to the farm to help with day-to-day tasks.

Last week, I took my son Andrew with me to help my father out with hauling heifers out of their summer pastures and cutting milo.  While waiting for "Grandpa Craig" to dump another load of milo on the grain cart, I asked Andrew why he liked coming to the farm so much.  His response?  "I just like being with you, Dad."  Now that is a family work culture worthy of much thanksgiving.
 



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Nov112015

Take the WHO Report with a Grain of Salt

Published by Kassie Curran at 8:35 AM under

You’ve likely heard at least one headline about the recent World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) report claiming that red meat is probably carcinogenic to humans. It hit the newsstands like wildfire, but the flames seem to have settled down a bit over the past week. I believe this is because consumers are smart enough to know that everything in moderation is a diet approach that has served us well for many years.

An important thing to consider when reviewing any report is how and what has been evaluated. According to the WHO website, the IARC evaluates cancer hazards, but not the risks associated with exposure. This is an important distinction as an agent is considered a cancer hazard if it is capable of causing cancer under some circumstances. Meanwhile, risk measures the probability that cancer will occur, taking into account the level of exposure to the agent. Ultimately, agents classified in the same group should not be compared as this can be misleading. “The types of exposure, extent of risk, people who may be at risk, and the cancer types linked with the agent can be very different across agent.”

The U.S. population, and the global population for that matter, is made up of all kinds of people with all kinds of dietary and health needs – there isn’t one solution to any problem, especially when it comes to diet and health. There are many factors that influence our health and we each need to determine what diet suits us best. Following the IARC report, the WHO has since suggested, “Meat provides a number of essential nutrients and, when consumed in moderation, has a place in a healthy diet.”

Ultimately, we have to decide for ourselves if we want to enjoy meat as part of a healthy, balanced diet. We can use recommendations from scientific bodies to guide us in these decisions, but they must be taken with a grain of salt as there is not one answer to the question of what is the right diet.

Remember that beef can be part of a healthy, balanced diet and we each get to decide what that looks like for us – for lots of great healthy beef recipes, check out the “Beef, It’s What’s For Dinner” website. < http://www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/recipecollection.aspx?id=10013 >

Eat Beef!

Kassie



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Oct012015

How We Roll

Published by Heath Larson at 7:08 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition

During September, I used up some vacation time in order to spend more time at home with my family than ever before.  For many people, vacation is a welcome respite from the "grind" and a much needed chance to slow down a bit. 

 

But in the Larson household, that's just not how we roll.  We didn't just go camping, we went primitive tent camping for multiple nights, during the hottest weekend of the year.  We didn't just have friends over, we had a whole crowd of friends over, as well as a longtime friend visiting from out of state.  We didn't just watch a football game, we drove across the state to attend the Kansas City Chiefs home opener vs. the Denver Broncos, with our youngest child.  In between, there were birthdays, a baptism, and board games.  Yard work, house work, and homework.  The State Fair, corn harvest, and trail runs.  To say we went "all out" is a massive understatement.

 

In fact, by the time vacation was nearly over, we were completely exhausted, and more than ready for a return to our normal, (slightly) less hectic routine.  However, with our friend coming to visit from out of town, we needed to come up with a top notch meal that was good enough to be "special," but not a complicated, messy chore to prepare.  Beef to the rescue.  We pulled out a 9x13 pan of homemade ground beef enchiladas from the freezer, along with two lean beef steaks, and served a basic salad and some fruit as sides, and cooked both the enchiladas and the steaks on the grill.  The result?  Predictably perfect.  More time spent sitting by the grill catching up with our friend, less time prepping and cleaning.  And when the steaks come off the grill in our house, they don't last long.  We went from too exhausted to cook to an "all out" celebration (that the kids would still eat) quicker than you can say "tenderloin." 

 

Now THAT is how we roll.



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Sep232015

Would you pay a premium for omega-3 enhanced beef?

Published by Kassie Curran at 9:39 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition

I recently completed my master’s degree in Agricultural Economics at Kansas State where I was able to work on a research project that is very interesting to me so I wanted to share with you a little bit of what I found. Don’t worry, I won’t get into the econometrics with you, but the title, “Consumer Acceptance of Omega-3 Enhanced Beef in Surveys and Retail Trials” should give you an idea about what I was working on.

 

Motivation for this research stems from the fact that the retail beef industry will continue to be shaped by changing consumer demand for meat products and their increasing awareness of omega-3 fatty acids, as well as demand for healthier food. Meanwhile, the beef industry and its stakeholders continue to pursue improvements in cattle production practices, beef processing methods, and marketing strategies. One of the opportunities for the beef industry to have a more positive role in the “health and nutrition” foods sector is through further nutrient enhancement with various feeding methods, which can help to meet the increasing demand for healthy foods. In particular, by feeding cattle an algae supplement, in addition to a conventional feed ration, the level of omega-3 fatty acids, especially DHA and EPA, can significantly increase (from 16 mg/4 oz. serving for conventional beef to 400 mg/4 oz. serving for enhanced beef in this study). However, the extent to which consumers are willing to accept and pay for the nutrient enhancement can either delay or propel the advancement of this practice.

 

 

The research in my thesis measures consumer acceptance and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for enhanced omega-3 steak and ground beef products compared to conventionally raised and grass-fed beef. Data was collected from a retail trial with a small retail outlet in Colorado, and a nation-wide survey which included a choice experiment. The analysis of this data provides a better understanding of consumer acceptance and willingness-to-pay for the omega-3 enhanced ground beef and steak products.

 

While the retail trial did not provide significant results due to inconsistent sales we did find that for omega-3 enhanced ground beef and steak, higher income is associated with a higher probability of purchase and that males are less likely to buy omega-3 enhanced product than females.
 

Results from the nation-wide survey indicate that overall acceptance and willingness to pay for omega-3 enhanced beef was below that of grass-fed beef, but above that of conventional beef. When additional information about omega-3s was provided, it increased willingness-to-pay for enhanced omega-3 enhanced ground beef, but had no impact on willingness-to-pay for enhanced omega-3 enhanced steak. Still, grass-fed beef was most preferred. Additionally, there was an evident preference for locally raised product, guaranteed tender steak, and 90/10 ground beef. Regarding food safety interventions with ground beef, steam pasteurization was associated with a higher than average utility, while irradiation was lower than average as expected.

 

The analysis showed that higher prices are associated with lower utility, which was expected, and females had a significantly higher WTP for grass-fed ground beef than males.  The average willingness-to-pay for grass-fed steak was estimated at $3.69/lb above conventionally raised product, compared to an estimated premium of $1.86/lb for omega-3 enhanced steak.  For ground beef the average premium for grass-fed product was estimated to be $1.27/lb compared to $0.79/lb for the omega-3 enhanced product. 

 

Though WTP premiums were found for omega-3 enhanced ground beef and steak, the estimates found are not necessarily high enough to justify the implementation of the enhanced omega-3 diet for cattle producers. If it costs less than these willingness-to-pay estimates to produce and market the omega-3 enhanced beef product, then this could be a viable production option for the beef industry. However, further research must be done to come to this conclusion.*

 

Remember, this is a brief overview of my research so if you are interested in learning more about the study, you can contact me with questions or view the complete document here: http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/20413

 

Eat Beef!
Kassie

*Research on cost of production is currently being conducted at Kansas State University.



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Jul272015

Beef Production, More than Just Steak

Published by Robin Kleine at 8:21 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General

Often when we speak of cattle production we only think about the meat we get from these animals. A juicy rib-eye is certainly a good supper (or breakfast or lunch for that matter), but sometimes we over look the MANY other products we get from cattle. These are called by-products, or secondary items that are produced in addition to the principal product.

 

Image courtesy of the Florida Beef Council

 

Obviously leather is a by-product, as it is made from the hide of animals. Therefore, items like car upholstery, wallets, purses, coats and footballs. Did you know that you can make 20 footballs with just one cowhide?

 

From the glands and organs of cattle, we get ingredients for making asphalt, plastic, insulation, medicines and soap. FUN FACT: Insulin is perhaps the best-known pharmaceutical derived from cattle. There are 5 million diabetics in the United States, and 1.25 million of them require insulin daily. It takes the pancreases from 26 cattle to provide enough insulin to keep one diabetic person alive for a year

 

Additionally, items like piano keys, chewing gum, knife handles and other candies are made from the bones and horns of cattle.

 

For more information regarding beef cattle and beef by-products, check out this handout from the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service -- http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/outreach-extension/uploaded_files/4-h-files/files/beef-handouts/beef%20byproducts.pdf.

 

Besides beef, which cattle by-products did you use today?

 

Until next time,

Robin



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Jun252015

Healthy Grilling & Sides for Fourth of July

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 3:04 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

The Fourth of July is a great time to fire up the grill and enjoy delicious lean beef.  If you are watching your waistline, follow these simple tips to make your cookout tasty and nutritious.

 

Marinade – Lean cuts like sirloin and round are usually less tender and flavorful than a ribeye.  So, to boost flavor and tenderness try a marinade.  It is recommended to marinate in the refrigerator, not at room temperature, to avoid the growth of harmful bacteria. Marinades only penetrate the surface of the meat; therefore, flat cuts of meat such as steaks will benefit more from marinades than large cuts such as roasts. 

 

Build a better Burger – if you are going the burger route make sure to choose 90% lean or leaner ground beef.  Many companies offer low-calorie bun choices that are 80-100 calories.  Toppings can make or break your burger.  Try choosing lower fat cheeses like provolone or mozzarella.  Better yet, Sargento® makes an Ultra-thin cheese slice to help with portion control.  Load up with veggies like lettuce, tomato, onions, mushrooms, peppers and pickles.  For condiments mustard is the best choice.  If choosing ketchup or BBQ, make sure to watch the sugar.  If you must have mayo or salad dressing, choose the olive or canola based ones, or a light option.

 

Slim up your Sides

 

Go Greek - Swap half or all of the mayo in your salad recipes for plain Greek yogurt.  Make sure to use a good quality brand like Fage® to avoid it being overly tangy. 

 

Watch the Sugar – Canned baked beans, and many recipes for baked beans have a ton of sugar.  Try making your own using a lower sugar BBQ sauce like Bigg’s or Jack Stack. 

 

Choose Whole Grains – If making a pasta salad, try swapping the enriched pasta for a less processed product like quinoa, millet or bulgur.  These grains will give your salad a fiber boost, plus they add a great texture and nutty flavor to your dish. 

 

Double the Veggies – Half of our plate should be fruits and vegetables.  Doubling the amount of vegetables in your sides will help you achieve this goal. 

 

 

Citrus-Marinated Beef & Fruit Kabobs

 

Makes 4 servings

 

Cubes of Top Sirloin are marinated for flavor in a mixture of fresh-squeezed orange juice, orange peel, cilantro and smoked paprika. They are then grilled alongside skewers of watermelon, peaches, and mango.

 

INGREDIENTS 1 pound beef Top Sirloin Steak Boneless, cut 1 inch thick 1 medium orange 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper (optional) 4 cups cubed mango, watermelon, peaches and/or plums Salt

Grate peel and squeeze 2 tablespoons juice from orange; reserve juice. Combine orange peel, cilantro, paprika, and ground red pepper, if desired, in small bowl. Cut beef Steak into 1-1/4-inch pieces. Place beef and 2-1/2 tablespoons cilantro mixture in food-safe plastic bag; turn to coat. Place remaining cilantro mixture and fruit in separate food-safe plastic bag; turn to coat. Close bags securely.Marinate beef and fruit in refrigerator 15 minutes to 2 hours. Soak eight 9-inch bamboo skewers in water 10 minutes; drain. Thread beef evenly onto four skewers leaving small space between pieces. Thread fruit onto remaining four separate skewers. Place kabobs on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill beef kabobs, covered, 8 to 10 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 9 to 11 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Grill fruit kabobs 5 to 7 minutes or until softened and beginning to brown, turning once. Season beef with salt, as desired. Drizzle reserved orange juice over fruit kabobs.

 

Ingredients:

1 pound beef Top Sirloin Steak Boneless, cut 1 inch thick

1 medium orange

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

1 tablespoon smoked paprika

1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper (optional)

4 cups cubed mango, watermelon, peaches and/or plums

Salt

Directions

1.       Grate peel and squeeze 2 tablespoons juice from orange; reserve juice. Combine orange peel, cilantro, paprika, and ground red pepper, if desired, in small bowl. Cut beef Steak into 1-1/4-inch pieces. Place beef and 2-1/2 tablespoons cilantro mixture in food-safe plastic bag; turn to coat. Place remaining cilantro mixture and fruit in separate food-safe plastic bag; turn to coat. Close bags securely.  Marinate beef and fruit in refrigerator 15 minutes to 2 hours.

2.       Soak eight 9-inch bamboo skewers in water 10 minutes; drain. Thread beef evenly onto four skewers leaving small space between pieces. Thread fruit onto remaining four separate skewers.

3.       Place kabobs on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill beef kabobs, covered, 8 to 10 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 9 to 11 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Grill fruit kabobs 5 to 7 minutes or until softened and beginning to brown, turning once.

4.       Season beef with salt, as desired. Drizzle reserved orange juice over fruit kabobs.

 

Nutrition information per serving: 239 calories; 6 g fat (2 g saturated fat; 2 g monounsaturated fat); 70 mg cholesterol; 57 mg sodium; 20 g carbohydrate; 2.4 g fiber; 27 g protein; 11.3 mg niacin; 0.7 mg vitamin B6; 1.5 mcg vitamin B12; 2.1 mg iron; 31.0 mcg selenium; 5.0 mg zinc; 107.1 mg choline.

This recipe is an excellent source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, selenium, zinc and choline; and a good source of iron.

 

Healthier Potato Salad

Serves: 5

Ingredients:


1 ½ lbs. red potatoes, cut into ¾ inch pieces

1 lb. radishes, cut into ¾ inch pieces

Salt and Pepper (can use celery salt)

2 Tablespoons white vinegar

1/4 cup light mayonnaise (I used Olive Oil Mayo)

1/4 cup nonfat Greek yogurt (I used Fage)

1 celery rib, chopped fine

1 1/2 Tablespoon sweet pickle relish

1 Tablespoon stone ground Dijon mustard

2 scallions, green parts only, sliced thin

Directions:

1.      Bring potato and radish pieces, 1 teaspoon salt, and enough water to cover potatoes and radishes by 1 inch to boil in large saucepan over high heat. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until just tender, about 10 minutes.

2.      Reserve 1/4 cup cooking water. Drain potatoes thoroughly, then transfer to large bowl. Drizzle vinegar over hot potatoes and gently toss until evenly coated. Transfer 3/4 cup potato/radish mixture to medium bowl; reserve. Refrigerate remaining potatoes/radishes until cooled, about 30 minutes.

3.      Using potato masher or fork, mash reserved hot potatoes/radishes with 3 tablespoons reserved cooking water until smooth, adding remaining cooking water as needed. Stir mayonnaise, yogurt, celery, relish, mustard, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon pepper into mashed potato. Refrigerate mixture until cooled, about 15 minutes.

4.      Add cooled potato dressing to cooed potatoes, stirring until evenly coated. Stir in scallions, cover, and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve. Salad can be refrigerated for up to 2 days.  Nutrition Facts: 110 calories, 1 g fat, 24 g carb, 3 g fiber, 5 g protein

 

Lower Sugar BBQ Baked Beans

Serves: 15

Ingredients:


2-3 slices bacon

1 cup yellow onion, diced

1 can pinto beans, no salt added

1 can navy beans

1 can black beans, no salt added

1 can kidney beans, no salt added

8 oz. can no salt added tomato sauce

1 ½ cups Biggs BBQ sauce, or another lower sugar BBQ

1 Tbsp. molasses

1-2 pkts of stevia

1 Tbsp. prepared mustard

1 Tbsp. adobo sauce

Directions:

Cook bacon in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until crisp.  Remove bacon from pan.  Add onion to drippings in pan; sauté 3 minutes.

Combine bacon, onion and remaining ingredients in a large bowl; toss well.  Spray a 2-qt. baking pan with nonstick spray and place the beans in the pan.  Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour.  Note: this can be made in a slow cooker, just stir all ingredients in slow cooker and cook on low 4-6 hours. 

Nutrition Facts per serving: 115 calories, 3 g fat, 300 mg sodium, 17 g carb, 3 g fiber, 6 g protein



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Jun182015

Father’s Day Grilling Tips

Published by Katie Sawyer at 3:16 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General

My father has always been the grill master in our house. My mom does the prep work; my father makes it great.

 

But my dad always operated the grill with a more-is-better attitude. More heat, more time, more done. I thought it was fine. I didn’t know any different. That is until my farmer/rancher husband came along. He had a whole different take on grilling and it was, well, delicious. Thankfully, my father was a willing student and quickly amended his grilling habits to create delicious medium-done steaks we all love.

 

As we approach Father’s Day this Sunday, I know I will find at least one of the men in my life – my father or my husband – behind the grill. When you raise beef, you tend to incorporate it into a lot of family meals. Plus, summer is the perfect time to enjoy a big, juicy steak.

 

It took my 30-something husband to teach my 60-something father the tips to perfect grilling. Thankfully, the Beef Checkoff (www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com) has simple, easy tips and recipes to make anyone a better griller. http://www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/grilling.aspx A few tips to make your Father’s Day grilling adventure the best one yet . . .

  1. Marinate your steaks and let them rest at room temperature before cooking. Don’t take your steaks directly from the refrigerator to the grill.

  2. Make sure your grill is nice and hot before adding the steaks. You want the heat to get to work immediately.

  3. Leave the steaks alone – quick poking, checking or flipping your meat. Closing the lid on your grill will keep the heat in and your fingers out!

  4. Steaks will typically require 3-7 minutes of cooking on each side, depending on thickness. You can also add marinade or salt and pepper while on the grill.

  5. Make sure your steak reaches safe internal temperatures. That’s 145°F for medium rare and 160°F for medium doneness.

  6. Don’t be quick to cut your steak. Let the steak sit for a minute or two before serving. This allows the juices to redistribute and make every bit juicy and delicious.

     

 

While you are enjoying your steak, don’t forget to wish your father a Happy Father’s Day – a great dessert to accompany your steak might just do the trick!



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Jun102015

Grill Your Fruit & Eat it Too

Published by Robin Kleine at 8:34 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

One of our favorite summer time meals is a grilled steak, accompanied by fruits and vegetables. Any time this office working girl gets outside is a plus … and around the grill is one of my places to be. As an added bonus, June is fresh fruit and vegetable month.

 

Watermelon is a summer staple at our house; there is always one in my fridge. But sometimes it can be monotonous, so I wanted to find a new way to eat the juicy red fruit.

 

I had heard good things about grilling watermelon and decided to try it myself. Result: it was delicious.

 

Plus, it’s easy to make and you probably have all the ingredients on hand.

 

Here’s how:

  • 8 slices seedless watermelon wedges, cut 1 ½ inches thick, no rind
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • sea salt
  • fresh ground pepper

 

Lightly sprinkle the wedges on both sides with the salt. Stand the wedges on their edges on a rack over a sink or pan and let them drain for half an hour.

 

Preheat the grill to high.

 

After the watermelon has drained, rinse each piece under cold running water. Place each piece between two folded paper towels and gently but firmly press to remove excess water. You should stop just when you feel the watermelon begin to crunch.

 

Brush the watermelon lightly on both sides with the olive oil. Grill over high heat until grill marks have formed and the melon is slightly softened, about 5 minutes.

 

Remove from grill and sprinkle with sea salt and a little fresh ground pepper.

 

*Recipe courtesy of JanuaryBride on www.food.com [http://www.food.com/recipe/grilled-watermelon-317554]



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Mar092015

Finding Balance

Published by Heath Larson at 10:16 AM under Beef Team | General | Nutrition | Recipe

I often get the question from co-workers and friends:  "How many miles per day do you run?"  It's a question I have a difficult time answering, because I don't do the same workout every day.  Some days, I run 5 fast miles.  But other days feature slower runs anywhere from 8-12 miles long.  You see, in order to run fast and long, one has to practice running fast and long.  Just not at the same time (until race day), in order to prevent injury and burnout.  All effective training programs do this, creating the perfect "balance" of speed, endurance, and recovery, to get you to the finish line as quickly as possible.

 

The same balance is required when it comes to a nutrition plan.  Complex carbohydrates provide much needed energy for those long runs, and aids in rebuilding energy stores after a workout.  Essential nutrients strengthen my immune system when I'm exhausted, and rev my metabolism.  Protein squashes hunger, and speeds muscle recovery, so I can get up and do it all again the next day. 

 

Finally, one has to find a balance of time.  The "average" day of running will take about 60 minutes of my time, when I consider time spent changing, stretching, and showering.  That's a big commitment for someone with a growing family and a hectic career!

 

Fortunately, when it comes to balancing time and nutritional needs, lean beef comes to the rescue.  It's an excellent source of zinc (boosts immune system function), vitamin B12 (releases energy from food), and protein, and good source of several other essential nutrients including iron, niacin, and vitamin B6.  It tastes great "as is," so I don't have to spend valuable time trying to spruce it up.  Plus, the kids love it, saving the time and energy of trying to get them to eat!  Two weeks ago, we entertained guests at our home with this very easy, yet impressive recipe featuring lean grilled flank steak.  And it even looked as beautiful as the picture!  Enjoy with a large Greek salad.

 

http://www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/recipe.aspx?id=2994



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