Kansas

Beef Chat

Apr042014

Details, Details

Published by Heath Larson at 9:10 AM under Beef Team | General | Nutrition

The start of the Boston Marathon is less than three weeks away.  It's crunch time.  Thankfully, the long training runs of 16 miles and longer are complete.  However, even with the best of training, there are many seemingly insignificant details that I will be busy dealing with before toeing the line on April 21st.  One example:

 

Electrolytes--The last time I ran the Boston Marathon was in 2009.  With only 4 or 5 miles to go, I just KNEW that something wasn't quite right.  But, spurred on by the raucous crowds, I was too stubborn to stop to figure it out.  In fact, I even quit stopping for water and Gatorade.  Bad idea.  When I finally drug my poor carcass across the finish line, I was quickly carted to the medical tent.  Elated about my finish but a bit "foggy" from the electrolyte imbalance, I was relieved when the staff cured me with a true miracle remedy: Two bags of the best potato chips I've ever tasted.  My electrolytes and hydration need to be dialed in on race day to prevent a reprise of this awful experience.

 

When I also think about the details of pacing strategy (math+hills+weather=confusion), crowds (Is it even possible to run fast in a crowd of 36,000?), blister avoidance (ouch), and chafing (even worse), it's easy to become overwhelmed.  However, to ignore these details is to invite disaster.

 

Most of us know that lean beef contains a large amount of muscle-building protein without a lot of calories.  But what about the details?  What about some of the unsung, dare I say, "forgotten" nutrients?

 

Zinc--Lean Beef is the number 1 food source for zinc. Many may know that zinc helps maintain a healthy immune system, but it also plays an important part in synthesizing protein.  How about that?  A high amount of protein, and an increased ability to process it too...all in that single 3 oz. serving of lean beef!

 

Vitamin B12--Lean beef is also the number 1 food source for vitamin B12.  This vitamin helps convert carbohydrates (which all runners love) into glucose (energy).  What more could a runner ask for?  Better hair in the finish line photo?!  Amazingly, vitamin B12 is important for healthy hair too!

 

I'm looking forward to putting all the details together for a solid race while representing Team Beef in Boston.  Many of them will have to come together at the last minute.  One thing, however, has already been decided:  There's nothing better than a steak the night before the race.

 



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Mar202014

National Nutrition Month

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 3:48 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

March is National Nutrition Month. The theme for 2014 is “Enjoy the taste of eating right.” The key to eating right is to combine both taste and nutrition to create healthy meals.  During busy weeknights, meals need to combine great taste and nutrition, along with convenience.  Lean beef is a tasty solution to this dinnertime dilemma.  With 29 cuts meeting the requirements for lean, beef is a tasty and nutritious addition to any meal.  Plus, lean beef is an excellent source of high quality protein, zinc and iron; and can be simple and easy to prepare.  Portion size is key, the recommended serving for beef is 3-4 ounces of cooked lean beef.  To complete your meal, aim to fill half of your plate with veggies and fruits, ¼ whole grain and one serving of low-fat dairy.  Try these winning recipes during your busy weeknights.

 

Buffalo-Style Beef Tacos - Combine cooked ground beef crumbles with buffalo wing hot sauce, as desired. Cook until heated through; spoon into hard or soft corn tortillas. Top with shredded lettuce, chopped carrots and celery. Drizzle with low-fat ranch or blue cheese dressing. Serve with Healthy Choice frozen yogurt and fresh or frozen berries.

 

Rock and Roll Beef Wraps

 

Rock and Roll Beef Wraps - Consumer -- A colorful way to introduce quinoa to your kids with ranch-seasoned Ground Beef and slaw.

A colorful way to introduce quinoa to your kids with ranch-seasoned Ground Beef and slaw.

Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

1 pound Ground Beef (93% lean or leaner)

1 cup water

1/3 cup uncooked quinoa

2 tablespoons dry ranch dressing mix

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

2 cups packaged broccoli or coleslaw mix

4 medium whole grain or spinach tortillas (7 to 8-inch diameter)

Toppings (optional):

Apple slices, red bell pepper strips, cucumber slices, carrot slices, sliced almonds or chow mein noodles

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ROCK AND ROLL BEEF WRAPS

1.       Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add Ground Beef; cook 8 to 10 minutes, breaking into 1/2-inch crumbles and stirring occasionally. Remove drippings.

2.       Stir in water, quinoa, ranch dressing mix and pepper; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 10 to 15 minutes or until quinoa is tender. Stir in slaw; cook, uncovered, 3 to 5 minutes or until slaw is crisp-tender, stirring occasionally.

3.       Divide beef mixture evenly among tortillas; garnish with toppings, as desired. Fold over sides of tortillas and rolling up to enclose filling.

·         Cooking times are for fresh or thoroughly thawed Ground Beef. Ground Beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F. Color is not a reliable indicator of Ground Beef doneness.

Nutrition information per serving: 418 calories; 12 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 76 mg cholesterol; 695 mg sodium; 41 g carbohydrate; 6.8 g fiber; 31 g protein; 6.4 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 2.3 mcg vitamin B12; 5.6 mg iron; 19.6 mcg selenium; 6.6 mg zinc; 84.2 mg choline.

This recipe is an excellent source of fiber, protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, iron, selenium and zinc; and a good source of choline.

 

Asian Beef & Vegetable Stir-Fry  -- Beef & Vegetable Stir-Fry

Complete meal in minutes! 

Serves: 4

Ingredients:


1 ½ lbs. chuck tender fillet, cut across the grain into thin strips

1 tsp. sesame oil

1 tbsp. canola oil

1-2 cloves garlic, minced

4 cups assorted precut Asian veggies (if frozen, cook a few minutes longer)

3 tbsp. water

½ cup prepared stir-fry sauce, House of Tsang classic stir-fry is a good one

2 cups cooked hot brown rice

2 tbsp. dry-roasted peanuts, optional

Directions:

  1. Place the water and veggies in a large nonstick skillet.  Cover and cook over medium-high heat four minutes, or until crisp-tender.  Remove and drain.

  2. Heat the same pan over medium-high heat with both oils and garlic.  Add beef in batches; stir-fry 1-2 minutes until outside is browned.

  3. Return all beef and veggies to pan.  Add stir-fry sauce and heat through.  Spoon over rice.  Sprinkle with peanuts if desired.

    Nutrition Facts per serving (with ½ cup rice): 390 calories, 5 g fat, 1.5 g saturated fat, 1100 mg sodium, 35 g carbohydrate, 4 g fiber, 35 g protein *Recipe provided by The Beef Council



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Feb132014

Heart Healthy Beef for You and Your Valentine

Published by Kassie Curran at 10:38 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

As we have shared many times on Kansas Beef Chat, lean beef is good for the heart. As part of the Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet (BOLD) study, individuals had a 10 percent decline in LDL (“bad”) cholesterol when they consumed lean beef as part of heart-healthy diet.

To celebrate your heart and Valentine’s Day, try one of these recipes using Tenderloin or T-Bone steaks. Not only are these beef cuts delicious, they are heart healthy, lean choices that are packed with nutrients including protein, zinc, vitamin B 12, vitamin B6, niacin, selenium, phosphorus, choline, iron, and riboflavin.

Spicy Five-Pepper T-Bone Steaks

Total Recipe Time:  60 minutes

INGREDIENTS

2 beef T-bone steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 16 ounces each)

Five-Pepper Seasoning:

3 tablespoons coarsely ground mixed peppercorns (black, white, green and pink)

2 teaspoons kosher or table salt

1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper

Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce:

2 teaspoons vegetable oil

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 cup ketchup

1/2 cup beef broth

1/3 cup raisins

3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon molasses

1 tablespoon soy sauce

Additional beef broth (optional)

1.  Combine Five-Pepper Seasoning ingredients in small bowl; mix well. Reserve 2 teaspoons for Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce. Set aside remaining mixture for seasoning beef steaks.

2.  To prepare Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce, heat oil in small saucepan over medium heat until hot. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir 1 to 2 minutes or until tender but not browned. Stir in ketchup, broth, raisins, vinegar, molasses, soy sauce and reserved 2 teaspoons Five-Pepper Seasoning; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer gently 10 minutes to blend flavors, stirring occasionally. (Sauce will thicken slightly.)

3.  Place sauce in blender or food processor container. Cover; pulse on and off for slightly chunky texture. (For a thinner sauce, additional broth may be added 1 tablespoon at a time; pulse on and off after each addition.) Return sauce to saucepan; keep warm until ready to serve.

4.  Press remaining Five-Pepper Seasoning evenly onto beef steaks. Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, uncovered, 14 to 16 minutes for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally.

5.  Remove bones; carve steaks crosswise into slices. Serve with sauce.

Makes 4 servings

Cook's Tip:  Spicy Peppercorn Steak Sauce may be prepared ahead and frozen in an airtight container for up to 2 months. To reheat, heat from frozen in a saucepan over medium heat until hot, stirring occasionally.

Cook's Tip:  Mixed peppercorns are sold in specialty food markets and some supermarkets. If a four-peppercorn mix is not available, a three-peppercorn mix may be substituted. Or make your own mix by combining equal amounts of whole black, white, green and pink peppercorns.

To easily grind whole peppercorns, use a pepper mill or coffee grinder (used only for seasonings). They can also be crushed in a food-safe plastic bag. Place the peppercorns in the bag, squeeze out the air and seal. Use the bottom of a custard cup, rolling pin or side of a heavy pan to crush the peppercorns.

Cook's Tip:  Serve this classic steak with simple sides such as steamed broccoli and roasted new potatoes.

Nutrition information per serving: 335 calories; 11 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 5 g monounsaturated fat); 48 mg cholesterol; 1984 mg sodium; 35 g carbohydrate; 3.1 g fiber; 26 g protein; 5.1 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 1.9 mcg vitamin B12; 4.5 mg iron; 9.8 mcg selenium; 4.6 mg zinc.

 

Grilled Beef Steaks with Espresso-Bourbon Sauce

Total Recipe Time:  35 minutes

INGREDIENTS

4 beef Tenderloin Steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 4 ounces each) or 2 Strip Steaks boneless, cut 1 inch thick (about 1-1/4 pounds)

Salt and pepper

Espresso-Bourbon Sauce:

1/4 cup bourbon

1/4 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons instant espresso coffee powder

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

1.  Combine all sauce ingredients, except pepper, in small saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, 8 minutes or until sauce is thickened and reduced by about half, stirring occasionally. Stir in pepper. Keep warm.

2.  Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill tenderloin steaks, covered, 10 to 14 minutes (top loin steaks 11 to 14 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Season with salt and pepper, as desired. Serve with sauce.

Nutrition information per serving, using Tenderloin Steaks: 271 calories; 7 g fat (3 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 67 mg cholesterol; 658 mg sodium; 15 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 26 g protein; 7.2 mg niacin; 0.5 mg vitamin B6; 1.4 mcg vitamin B12; 1.8 mg iron; 28.9 mcg selenium; 5.4 mg zinc; 95.1 mg choline.

Find these and more great beef recipes at www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com.

Eat Beef!!!

Kassie



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Feb072014

Good Fats for Good Health

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 3:26 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition | Recipe

There’s news about your health and the fats you eat that may surprise you… you don’t have to avoid fat! The key is to eliminate trans fats and limit saturated fats in your diet; while focusing on increasing unsaturated fats as much as possible.  Examples of this would be to choose lean cuts of beef that contain the word “round” or “loin”, or simply replace a high-fat salad topping (bacon) with nuts. Research has shown substituting 5% of saturated fat in the diet with more heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats may decrease the risk of developing heart disease by 7%. Celebrate National Heart Healthy month by taking steps to protect your heart with healthy, unsaturated fats. It may be easier than you think! Plus, it doesn’t mean you have to give up eating red meat. The BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet) study compared the consumption of 4 ounces of lean beef daily to the gold standard of heart-healthy eating, the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. Both diets contained a similar mix of nutrients, including fewer than 7% of calories from saturated fat, but the BOLD diet contained 4 ounces of lean beef each day while the DASH diet limited red meat. At the end of the study, BOTH diets lowered LDL “bad” cholesterol in participants by 10%, providing evidence that beef may not be as bad for cholesterol and heart health as once thought. 

Which types of fats should I look for?
Omega 3s (Polyunsaturated Fat)
Omega 9s (Monounsaturated Fat)
Steric Acid – a non-harmful form of saturated fat found naturally in beef

What are the possible benefits?
Healthy Heart
Improved Blood Cholesterol
Blood Sugar Control
Brain Development & Function
Improved Mood


Healthy Fat Shopping List:
Fruit:
Avocado & Olives
Nuts:
Almonds, Pistachios, Walnuts, Hy-Vee Natural Peanut Butter
Oils:
Canola, Olive, Sunflower
Beef:
Round & Loin cuts, 95% lean ground beef or leaner
Fish:
Salmon, Tuna, Mackerel

 

Grilled Steaks with Beets & Radicchio
Makes: 2 servings


Ingredients: 
2 tablespoons crumbled reduced fat feta cheese
2 teaspoons white-wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1 tablespoon minced shallot
2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1 small head radicchio, halved, cored and each half quartered
1 8-ounce can baby beets, drained
8 ounces top sirloin steak, trimmed and cut into 2 portions
 
Directions:
1. Preheat grill to high.
2. Place cheese in a medium bowl and mash it with the back of a spoon until creamy. Add vinegar, dry mustard, shallot, parsley, 1/8 teaspoon salt and 1/8 teaspoon pepper; whisk to combine. Slowly drizzle in 2 teaspoons oil and whisk until blended.
3. Thread radicchio chunks and beets onto skewers and drizzle with 1 teaspoon oil. Rub steaks with the remaining 1/2 teaspoon oil. Season the steaks and skewered vegetables with the remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt and pepper.
4. Grill the steaks 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium-rare. Grill the vegetable skewers, turning frequently, until the radicchio is wilted and lightly charred, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer the steaks to a plate; let rest for 5 minutes. Remove the vegetables from the skewers. Serve steaks and vegetables with the sauce.
Recipe slightly adapted from EatingWell, Inc.
Nutrition Facts per serving: 302 calories; 16 g fat ( 4 g saturated , 9 g monounsaturated ); 64 mg cholesterol; 15 g carbohydrates; 26 g protein; 3 g fiber; 458 mg sodium; 819 mg potassium.



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Jan232014

Chicken Or Beef?

Published by Robin Kleine at 10:02 AM under

For the first time, chicken outsold beef in the United States in 2013. Fifty years ago, Americans only ate about 20 lbs. of chicken per year. Today, we eat nearly 58 lbs./year.

What has changed in our economy that families everywhere are choosing poultry over a hearty, delicious roast, hamburger or steak?

BEEF Magazine blogger, Amanda Radke, asks, “Americans now eat less beef then they did in 1955, but is the change a result of a healthier diet or because people are choosing the cheaper option?”

  

According to a recent survey from the national beef checkoff, Millenials (born between 1980 and 2000) cited 10 reasons for choosing chicken over beef when preparing food for their children. To read the entire article, click here - http://beefmagazine.com/beef-demand/industry-glance-millennial-parents-chicken-vs-beef

 

 

 

Additionally, the poultry industry in the United States has grown tremendously in recent years. A report from the USDA Economic Research Service (http://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2012-september/us-consumption-of-chicken.aspx#.UuAFrPbnbjA) states, “Chicken's relatively lower price may, in part, reflect efficiencies in chicken production that have led to lower bird mortality rates and a higher average live weight per broiler--5.8 pounds today versus 3.4 pounds in 1960.”

 

With these improvements and others, poultry producers can now have meat readily available more quickly and with lower input costs thanks to technological advancements.

 

As beef producers, we have some of the highest input costs. And although we are producing more pounds of beef with fewer cattle and less land than before, the cost of our protein source is still high, when compared to chicken.

 

So what advantages does beef have over chicken?

These are my favorite talking points -

 

  • There are 29 lean cuts of beef to choose from, and many of them are nutritionally similar to a boneless, skinless chicken breast. Three ounces of beef is a great source of protein, zinc, Vitamin B12, selenium, phosphorus, choline, niacin, vitamin B6, iron and riboflavin. It’s also less than 10% of your calories in a 2,000-calorie diet. 

  • It’s a great way to “cook once, dine twice.” Buy a chuck roast (also a lean cut) at your local grocery store, and make a tasty pot roast using a slow cooker. Then, with the leftovers have sandwiches the next night. You can also serve on top of your favorite greens for a quick salad option. Sometimes, you can buy a roast for as low as $2.99/lb. 

  • Some cuts, like ground beef or a thinly sliced sandwich steak can be cooked just as quickly as their chicken counterparts. 

  • Taste! When choosing between a chicken breast and a strip steak prepared the same way, I’d rather have the steak!

Photo courtesy of oklahomafarmreport.com

 

So, when you’re visiting with family members or perhaps a stranger in the grocery store, remember these talking points. You might even want to carry this handy card (http://www.idbeef.org/CMDocs/IdahoBC/29%20lean%20cuts%20wallet%20card_low.pdf)  in your wallet to share with anyone on the fence about the benefits of beef.

 

Until next time,
Robin



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Dec052013

Vegas Strip Making Waves in the Beef Industry

Published by Katie Sawyer at 2:09 AM under Agriculture | Coffee Shop Talk | General | Nutrition

Beef has always come from a cow. But cows and the beef they produce have substantially improved over the past decade. While beef cuts are as juicy and tender as ever and consumers have as many choices as there are tastes, the beef industry continues to look for new ways to deliver its product and keep consumers satisfied.

 

The Vegas Strip Steak is now the newest cut to hit menus. The 14-ounce steak can be cut into smaller portions but boasts tenderness on par with the New York Strip Steak, a robust flavor and has a visual appeal that helps with plating and presentation.

 

The cut was crafted by Dallas, Texas, meat scientist Tony Mata, and comes from the muscle under the animal’s shoulder blade. Mata and others believe there are still a few more cuts to mine from the well-researched animal – the Vegas Strip Steak proves as much.

 

It’s people like Mata that allow the beef industry to consistently evolve and enhance its offerings.  As consumers continue to demand more affordable options, both at home and in restaurants, the beef industry continues to respond.

 

As cattle owners, it’s both inspiring and rewarding to see scientists and processors finding even more opportunities for our animals. We work hard to raise high-quality animals so chefs and mothers alike can serve tasty, high-quality beef.

 

Learn more about the Vegas Strip Steak at http://vegasstripsteak.com/site/

 

Katie and her husband, Derek, are the fourth generation to own and operate the Sawyer family farm and cattle operation. The couple owns a certified Angus cow herd and background cattle on their farm outside McPherson. Follow Katie on Twitter @Sawyerfarm



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Nov142013

The Color of Victory

Published by Heath Larson at 9:10 AM under

 The color of victory is bright red.  While Oakland Raider fans may take exception to that statement, it’s pretty hard to argue with success.  The Kansas City Chiefs, the worst team in the NFL last year, currently stand alone as the sole remaining undefeated team in the league at 9-0.  It is a special family tradition for the Larson family to listen to the entire game on the radio every Sunday after Mass.  Each week, we tune in to see if they will do what was simply unthinkable in past years:  Extend their winning streak.
 
After the attacks at the Boston Marathon this past spring, I also set my sights on a seemingly impossible set of tasks:  Qualifying and entering for the Boston Marathon, Running under 3 hours in a marathon, and winning my favorite local trail 10k, all while making the transition to a completely new job and being the family man that I needed to be.  “Is this even possible?”  I thought.  I didn’t know, but I donned my bright red Team Beef jersey and started training. 
  
 
Qualifying for Boston would not be easy.  The only marathon that fit my schedule was in Pocatello, ID.  Not the most glamorous (or convenient) place to be traveling to on one’s off days.  Add in the fact that the race would occur at an average elevation of one mile above sea level, and it was a recipe for disaster.  With nine miles left in the race, I was wondering if the best part of the weekend would be the free five-pound bag of potatoes I got for showing up.  Looking at my watch, I realized that running under 3 hours would require a pace of 6:30/mile…well under my usual marathon pace of 7:00/mile.  With little to lose but my lunch, I went for it and somehow crossed the line over 3 minutes under my 3 hour goal, and well under the qualifying time for Boston.  This spring, Team Beef will be heavily represented by a sea of red jerseys, including mine, running Boston’s streets in the most storied marathon in the world.
 
 

After successfully completing the final goal of winning my favorite local trail race (after about 10 years of trying), it was time to fire up the grill in celebration not only of a successful running season, but also my son’s first birthday.  When a celebration is in order, there’s only one color of meat I want to see on my grill:  The deep, glorious red of protein-packed lean beef.  Our family must agree with me, because there wasn’t much left over!

So whether you’re looking for a lean yet filling fuel for tomorrow’s long run, or the perfect cut of meat to feed the masses at your Kansas City Chiefs tailgate, don’t forget:  The color of victory is bright red.  Eat beef!
 

 



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Aug082013

Harvesting Healthy Meals

Published by Amber Groeling RD LD at 6:13 AM under General | Nutrition | Recipe

The end of the summer season may be fast approaching, but we still have a few weeks to enjoy many of the tastes associated with warmer weather. Gardens and produce departments have an abundance of end-of-summer vegetables just waiting to be added to your meals!

 

With all the readily available fruits and vegetables being harvested from gardens, now is a great time to get in the habit of eating the MyPlate way. Try using these tips to fill half your plate with veggies vegetables at lunch and dinner.  And don’t forget the lean beef!  The weather is still great for grilling lean steaks, my top choice is the sirloin because it is lean, tender and flavorful!  Grill up enough steak to enjoy leftovers on a salad or wrap for lunch the next day! If you are making a dish with ground beef be sure to choose 90% or leaner ground beef.

 

Zucchini – Best known for bread, but don’t overlook these other great ways to enjoy zucchini:

·         Grill it. Thinly slice and grill in an aluminum foil pouch with olive oil, spices and other vegetables.

·         Add to salads and sauces. Dice and add to summer salads or to pasta sauces.

·         Replace all or some lasagna noodles with zucchini ribbons. This will drastically lower the carbohydrates and calories in your pasta dish.

 

Tomatoes – Go beyond BLTs and salsa by trying one of these simple ways to serve tomatoes:

·         Create a cold salad with quinoa, halved cherry tomatoes, diced cucumbers, chopped green peppers, and chilled fully cooked thinly slices beef. Toss with olive oil.

·         Bake tomatoes for a warm side dish. Spray or drizzle a baking dish with olive oil, slice tomatoes about ½-inch thick and sprinkle with whole wheat bread crumbs and shredded Parmesan cheese. Bake until tomatoes start to soften.

 

Peppers – A perfect complement to a variety of dishes. Try one of these ways to eat more peppers:

·         For extra color, add sliced or diced pepper to your favorite lettuce salad.

·         Grill them. Brush with olive oil and lightly season for a great way to get in a vegetable serving.

·         Add to soups, salads, pizza and pasta dishes for added texture and flavor.

·         Make Philly Steak Peppers – Fill peppers with thinly sliced roast beef, onion and provolone cheese. Bake and enjoy with a side of fruit for a meal in minutes.

 

Potatoes – A fan favorite that can be made healthier with a few simple steps.

·         Try serving a baked potato bar for upcoming tailgate parties. Be sure to have lots of healthy toppings, chili, salsa, shredded cheese, peppers, chopped ham and Greek yogurt in place of sour cream.

·         Swap out some of the mayo in your potato salad and cut hundreds of calories from this popular picnic dish.

 

This recipes takes full advantage of the summer harvest!  Enjoy!

 

SONOMA STEAKS WITH VEGETABLES BOCCONCINI

 

 

 

INGREDIENTS

2 boneless beef top loin (strip) steaks, cut 3/4 inch thick (about 8 ounces each)

1 container (9 to 16 ounces) herb-marinated small fresh mozzarella balls, also known as bocconcini, can use fresh mozzarella diced and 1/3 cup vinaigrette if you can’t find bocconcini

3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 medium zucchini, cut diagonally into 1/4-inch thick slices

1 large yellow bell pepper, cut into 3/4-inch wide strips

1 cup small red grape tomatoes

INSTRUCTIONS

1.    Drain bocconcini, reserving 1/3 cup marinade. Combine reserved marinade and vinegar in small bowl. Toss zucchini and bell pepper with 2 tablespoons marinade mixture in large bowl; cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Place beef steaks and remaining marinade mixture in food-safe plastic bag; turn steaks to coat. Close bag securely and marinate in refrigerator 15 minutes to 2 hours.

2.    Remove steaks from marinade; discard marinade. Remove vegetables from marinade; place in grill basket. Place steaks on one half of grid over medium, ash-covered coals; place grill basket on other half of grid. Grill steaks, covered, 7 to 10 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, times remain the same) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Remove steaks; keep warm. Grill vegetables 10 to 13 minutes or until crisp-tender, stirring occasionally. Add tomatoes during last 2 minutes of grilling.

3.    Combine grilled vegetables and bocconcini in large bowl; toss gently to combine. Carve steaks into slices; season with salt, as desired. Serve with vegetable mixture.

Nutrition information per serving: 380 calories; 21 g fat (12 g saturated fat; 3 g monounsaturated fat); 106 mg cholesterol; 152 mg sodium; 8 g carbohydrate; 1.8 g fiber; 38 g protein; 8.0 mg niacin; 0.8 mg vitamin B6; 1.4 mcg vitamin B12; 2.4 mg iron; 29.0 mcg selenium; 4.9 mg zinc.

This recipe is an excellent source of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, selenium and zinc; and a good source of iron.

 

 

The information is not intended as medical advice.   Please consult a medical professional for individual advice.

 



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Jun072013

June Already?!

Published by Kiley Stinson at 10:32 AM under Coffee Shop Talk | General | Recipe

Wow, the month of June sure snuck up on me… or maybe June sneaked up on me? Either way, I feel like I flipped the calendar from April straight to June. Since my schedule seems to be so busy this time of year there typically isn’t a whole lot of time to spend: a.) At home and b.) Time in the kitchen.
 
I usually like to maximize as much of my time outdoors as I possibly can, which often leaves me coming inside the house thinking about eating my evening meal at nine o’clock at night. That doesn’t leave a whole lot of time to prep, cook and clean up a meal. Often times I find myself glancing at the total recipe time when looking for something new to try. Recently, I found this new gem of a recipe which features my favorite protein, BEEF of course!  This new recipe I found is a close rendition to the lettuce wraps; a popular restaurant menu item I like to enjoy when dining at P.F. Chang’s. Wrapping grilled Strip steaks in crunchy lettuce leaves and topping them off with strips of your favorite veggies…what’s not to love? Plus, its lean, healthy, quick and delicious
 
Inside-Out Grilled Steak Salad
Total Recipe Time: 20 to 25 minutes
INGREDIENTS
2 beef Strip steaks boneless, cut 1 inch thick (about 10 ounces each)
2 teaspoons sweet paprika
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon coarse grind or cracked black pepper
2 cups thin assorted vegetable strips, such as cucumber, red onion, carrots, bell pepper, sugar snap peas
1/4 cup frozen shelled edamame, thawed or frozen peas or corn, thawed
1/4 cup reduced-fat or regular vinaigrette (any variety)
16 Boston or butter lettuce leaves (about 4 to 5-inch diameter)
1/3 cup crumbled goat or blue cheese (optional)
1/3 cup toasted chopped almonds, walnuts, pecans or hazelnuts (optional)
INSTRUCTIONS
1.Combine paprika, garlic and pepper; press evenly onto beef steaks.
2.Place steaks on grill over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 11 to 14 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, covered, 11 to 15 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally.
 3.Carve steaks into slices. Place lettuce leaves on serving platter. Evenly layer vegetables onto lettuce leaves. Top evenly with steak. Drizzle with vinaigrette; sprinkle with nuts and cheese, if desired.
That’s it! Seriously simple; just how I like it.
For even more quick and easy ideas check out http://beefitswhatsfordinner.com/recipes.aspx 
Enjoy!
Kiley Stinson
 


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May082013

May Is Beef Month

Published by Deena Robinson at 4:48 AM under General | Nutrition

In Kansas, we celebrate the delicious and nutrient-rich beef during the month of May. Cattle ranchers in Kansas thank you for being loyal beef lovers this month and every month!
 
I was a beef lover before I came to the Beef Council. I knew it was good for me, providing protein, but I didn’t know that beef had so many other important nutrients too! Did you know that beef delivers 10 essential nutrients like protein, iron, zinc and B-vitamins? Do you struggle with low iron? I do. Unlike plant proteins, lean beef is the food supply’s most easily absorbed source of iron and zinc. Iron and zinc play a vital role in many biological functions. Iron helps carry oxygen to body cells and tissues, assists in making new red blood cells, aids in brain development and supports the immune system.  Zinc has been shown to improve cognitive performance in healthy school-age children. 
 
I love the fact that a 3 oz. serving of lean beef provides 48% of the Daily Value for protein in 150 calories. Studies I have read have shown that protein can help maintain a healthy weight, build muscle and fuel physical activity, which I need to keep up with my kids and their activities. It makes me feel fuller longer and satisfies my cravings faster!
 
I am so thankful to the Kansas farmers and ranchers that raise such a delicious and nutritious product. I am also proud to know great ranching families that are so dedicated to high standards in animal care and environmental practices. They take the 15.9 million acres of Kansas pasture land that is not suitable for growing crops and graze their cattle. The cattle then turn those resources into essential protein and nutrients for me and my family, families across the United States and the world. 
It is grilling season and I am so excited to have grilled burgers and steaks with my family. My mouth is watering just thinking about it! If you love to grill too, find the time to thank a rancher in your area. They work hard to provide the safe, nutritious and delicious beef you hear sizzling on the grill.
 
Beef. It’s what’s for dinner…and lunch and breakfast. Or all three!


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